Municipal Licensing & Standards

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ML&S Policy, Research, Public Consultations and Events

Municipal Licensing & Standards conducts municipal legislative research and reviews which include in-depth consultation with the public, businesses and other key stakeholders.  

We invite you to share your views at a meeting, by filling out an online survey, or emailing or calling us.

View a list of all ML&S Consultations here.

What's happening

ExpandTow Truck Bylaw Review

Picture of a tow truck

The City of Toronto Municipal Licensing and Standards (ML&S) Division is undertaking a review of the City's Tow Truck Bylaw, Municipal Code Chapter 545, LicensingArticle VI, to identify opportunities for improving Toronto's tow truck industry.

Have your say at an upcoming consultation.

 

Monday, January 23, 2017, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Metro Hall, Rooms 308/309 55 John Street, Toronto ON M5V 3C6

Specific towing industry stakeholders will be invited to attend this meeting to provide input on potential by-law amendments the City is considering, including updates to the current towing rates.

This meeting is by invitation only. Please contact us if you would like to attend.

 

To be determined - January-March, 2017

Industry stakeholders and members of the public are invited to attend this meeting to provide input on potential by-law amendments the City is considering, including updates to the current towing rates.

This is an open meeting; anyone may attend.

Please contact us as soon as possible if you require accommodation to participate in the public consultation process

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ExpandLicensing Rental Apartment Buildings

Thank you to everyone that took our recent survey on Licensing Rental Apartment Buildings. The results of this survey will be summarized and considered as part of the City's report to the Licensing and Standards Committee in the fall. 

 

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ExpandMonitoring Noise in Toronto

Toronto Public Health in collaboration with Ryerson University conducted a study on noise levels in the City of Toronto from August to October 2016. Outcomes of the study will be used to inform the noise bylaw review. 

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Municipal Reviews

ExpandHolistic Centres and Practitioners Review

Overview

Municipal Licensing & Standards (ML&S) is in the process of reviewing the City bylaw for Holistic Centres and Practitioners, Municipal Code Chapter 545, Article XI.

An important focus of the review is to address the concern that illegal body rub parlours are operating as holistic centres. The review is examining how to address these concerns.

Last year we held consultations with industry stakeholders, the public and Council. ML&S is continuing consultations with the industry stakeholders by holding two public consultation meetings for all Professional Holistic Associations (PHAs) that are on the list approved by Council (please see below for details). The purpose of these meetings is to get input on the City's process of approving PHAs and on establishing procedures and criteria to revoke the approval, if necessary.

Feedback will inform the report to City Council. 

Decision History

At its July 14, 1998 meeting, the Emergency and Protective Services Committee adopted the recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Complementary Therapies, established by the City, concerning the creation of the Bylaw for holistic business to screen out the illegitimate operators and to protect the health and safety and well-being of consumers and the general public. 

http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/1998/minutes/committees/ep/ep980714.pdf

At its meeting of July 19, 20, 21, and 26, 2005, City Council approved the amended report concerning the Licensing Strategy to Deal with Illegal Body Rub Activity in Licensed Premises. 

http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/2005/agendas/council/cc050719/plt6rpt/cl006.pdf

At its meeting of December 5, 6, and 7 2005, City Council approved the report concerning Proposed Amendments to the City of Toronto Municipal Code, Chapter 545, Licensing Regarding Hours of Operation for Holistic and Traditional Medicine Establishments. 

http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/2005/agendas/council/cc051205/plt10rpt/cl007.pdf

At its April 25, 26, and 27, 2006, Council received for information the report Review of the Recommendations Presented by the Holistic Stakeholders Including the Effectiveness of the Markham Registry By-law and its Applicability to the City of Toronto. This report also outlined staff plan concerning the process of removal of PHAs from the approved list. 

http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/2006/agendas/committees/plt/plt060306/it013.pdf

http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/2006/agendas/council/cc060425/plt2rpt/cl013.pdf

At its June 28, 2012 meeting, the Licensing and Standards Committee (L&S) referred a request for a staff report to increase and ensure effective prosecution of charges against body rub, holistic and adult entertainment establishments to the Executive Director, ML&S, and the City Solicitor, for a joint report to the L&S. 

http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2012.LS14.3 

At its December 16, 2013 meeting, City Council requested  the City Manager, the City Solicitor, and the Deputy City Managers, Clusters A and B, to report back to the Executive Committee on a strategy to more vigorously prosecute charges related to municipal by-law infractions by the adult entertainment, body rub, and holistic license classes. 

http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2013.EX36.13

Get Involved

Consultations

All approved PHAs have been invited to consultations to be held on Monday, April 28, 2014 at City Hall, 2nd floor, Committee Room No. 3. We invite these associations to attend one of two identical sessions: the morning session from 9:30 am to 12 p.m. or the evening session from 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.   

View the consultation presentation here.

 

ExpandSigns Review

collage of 5 temporary signsThe City of Toronto Municipal Licensing and Standards (ML&S) Division is undertaking a review of Chapter 693, Signs.  

At the direction of the Licensing and Standards Committee, a review was completed of the existing election sign bylaw in 2014 (Chapter 693, Article II).  ML&S is now reviewing the amendments previously proposed with respect to election signs, as part of an overall review of Chapter 693, Signs. This will also include a review of temporary signs, including a new category of "civic participation signs".   Details of each review are below. 

2015 Review - Elections, Temporary Signs and Civic Participation Signs

Municipal Licensing and Standards is reviewing the amendments previously proposed with respect to election signs, as part of an overall review of Chapter 693, Signs. This will also include a review of temporary signs, including a new category of "civic participation signs".  

Temporary Signs

Municipal Licensing and Standards is looking to replace Chapter 693, Signs, Article III, Temporary Signs with general regulations that cover the various types of temporary signs.

Civic Participation Signs

Municipal Licensing and Standards is looking at developing regulations to allow residents to display temporary signs on private property to express messages on issues of public interest, as a form of civic participation. Staff received this direction at the December 2013 Licensing and Standards Committee.

Related documentation:

Phases of the Current Signs Review

The review is being undertaken in three overlapping phases:

  • Phase 1: Research and Analysis – August to October 2015
  • Phase 2: Public and Stakeholder Consultations – October 2015
  • Phase 3: Report – November 2015

 (November 26, 2015 Licensing & Standards Committee,  December 9, 2015 City Council)

2014 Review - Election Signs

Overview

At the direction of the Licensing and Standards Committee at its meeting on May 26, 2014, Municipal Licensing and Standards conducted a review of the City's existing election signs bylaw, pursuant to Chapter 693, Article II, and reported back to the August 18, 2014 meeting on recommended changes.

As part of the report, ML&S consulted with candidates and members of the public on:

  • the timing of election signs
  • the $250 refundable election sign deposit
  • the affidavit/waiver of fees/fines process
  • placement of election signs
  • fees and storage of unlawfully erected election signs
  • payment methods

Related documentation:

Phases of the Review

The review proceeded in three phases:

  • Phase 1: Research and Analysis – June 2014
  • Phase 2: Stakeholder Consultations – July 2014
  • Phase 3: Report – August 2014

Phase 1: Research and Analysis

June 2014

Staff performed research and analysis into the existing bylaw, election sign issues experienced in previous elections, options to address the issues identified, and conducted a jurisdictional scan of the election sign bylaws of other municipalities.

Phase 2: Stakeholder Consultations

July 2014

Based on the findings in the first phase of the review, staff consulted with stakeholders on potential amendments to the current by-law governing election signs.

Staff accepted input through consultations, meetings, emails to lchua@toronto.ca, voice messages left at 416-338-3594, and written submissions.

Review the presentation delivered at the public consultation on July 16th at City Hall, and the summary of the input.

Phase 3: Report

August 2014
Based on the research, analysis, and consultations, staff reported to the Licensing and Standards Committee on amendments to Chapter 693, Article II, Election Signs.

The report with recommendations was introduced at the August 18, 2014 meeting.  View the presentation delivered by ML&S to the Licensing & Standards Committee.

Council Decision

Staff brought forward a report: Amendments to Chapter 693, Signs, Article II, Election Signs to the August 18, 2014 meeting of the Licensing and Standards Committee and a further report: Chapter 693, Signs, Article II, Election Signs – Additional Amendments to the August 25th Meeting of City Council.

City Council referred the item back to the Licensing and Standards Committee for further consideration in the second quarter of 2015.

http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2014.LS30.1

As of October 2015, the current regulations governing Election Signs remain unchanged.

Placement of Election Signs – Frequently Asked Questions

Download the PDF version of this section.

What is an election sign?

An election sign is any sign:

  • advertising or promoting a candidate in an election, or
  • intended to influence persons to vote for or against any candidate

 When can election signs be erected/displayed?

  • 25 days prior to election day for municipal elections

When do election signs have to be removed?

  • 72 hours after the completion of voting on election day

What is the maximum allowable size of an election sign?

Election signs must be no larger than 1.2 square metres in area, except on:

  • campaign offices
  • on TTC dedicated advertising space, where signs may be up to 2.3 square metres in area

 

How high can election signs be erected/displayed?

  • Outdoors, election signs must be no higher than two metres above ground level, except on campaign offices
  • Indoors, election signs in buildings on private property, may be displayed higher than 2 metres 

What restrictions must be followed?

All election signs must not:

  • be illuminated
  • be attached to trees
  • interfere with the safe operation of vehicles or pedestrian safety

Where can election signs be erected/displayed?

 
Private Property:
  • with the consent of the owner/occupant of the property
  • on an illuminated billboard (with a permit issued under the applicable sign bylaw)
  • on a highway or a public utility pole located on a highway
  • on a structure including a bus shelter and a municipal garbage container located on a highway (under agreement with the City or its Agencies, Boards, or Commissions)
  • on Toronto Transit Commission dedicated advertising space (under agreement with TTC)

Public Property:

 On a highway, election signs must not be erected/displayed:

  • within 1.5 metres of the curb or edge of pavement on highways without sidewalks
  • between the curb and the sidewalk on highways with sidewalks
  • within 15 metres of an intersection or pedestrian crossover
  • on a median or island
  • adjacent to a voting place, City park or a facility that is owned or operated by the City
  • without the consent of the owner/occupant of the property

Can election signs be erected/displayed on fences?

Yes, provided that they are erected/displayed with the consent of the owner/occupant of the property

Diagram showing location where Election Signs can be placed

(*Diagram not to scale)