Health Surveillance and Epidemiology

The Unequal City 2015 Report

Toronto residents don’t all have equal opportunities to be healthy.

Major differences in health status exist between people because of their social and economic circumstances, and where they live, work, learn and play. Income plays an important role in health inequities.

The Unequal City 2015 report provides current information on differences in health between income groups in Toronto. The report describes the relationship between income and health for 34 health status indicators and measures changes in health inequities over approximately 10 years. 

This report is the first to analyze how health inequities have changed over time in Toronto.

 

The Unequal City Report 2015 Key Findings

ExpandCurrent Health Inequities

Low-income groups in Toronto have worse health for 20 of the 34 health stats indicators.

For the most recent years of health data analyzed, the following 20 health status indicators showed significant inequities where low income groups had worse health:

MalesFemalesCombined Male and Female
  • Cardiovascular Disease Premature Mortality
  • Diabetes
  • Fair or Poor Self Rated Health
  • Life Expectancy
  • Lung Cancer
  • Physical Inactivity
  • Premature Mortality
  • Smoking
  • Youth Chlamydia
  • Youth Gonorrhea
  • Cardiovascular Disease Premature Mortality
  • Diabetes
  • Fair or Poor Self Rated Health
  • Physical Inactivity
  • Premature Mortality
  • Teen Pregnancy
  • Youth Chlamydia
  • Youth Gonorrhea
  • Readiness to Learn
  • Singleton Low Birth Weight

ExpandSelected Income Group Comparisons

When compared to the highest income group:

  • Men in the lowest income group are 50% more likely to die before age 75
  • Women in the lowest income group are 85% more likely to have diabetes
  • Young women aged 15-24 in the lowest income group are twice as likely to be reported with chlamydia
  • Babies in the lowest income group are 40% more likely to be born with a low birth weight