Permits & Rentals

Tree Permits

Trees

The City of Toronto is dedicated to protecting trees on both public and private lands in recognition of the multitude of social, economic and environmental benefits trees provide and as a means of protecting and enhancing the city's natural heritage.

Planning on doing construction work around City owned or private trees? Trees are a valuable asset in our city and a number of regulations and guidelines are in place to protect them. In this section, you will learn how to protect and grow our urban forest and apply for permits to injure or remove trees.

Urban Forestry Permits

tree during summer on private property in front of residence

Trees on Private Property

Information about tress on private property, what you can do to trees, when you can do it, how to comply with by-laws protecting trees on your property

Trees on City Streets

Trees on City Streets

A major responsibility of Urban Forestry is the maintenance of City owned trees, particularly trees that grow on the City road allowance. Urban Forestry is responsible for maintaining approximately 600,000 City owned street trees.  

Trees in Ravines

Trees in Ravines

Toronto's network of ravines is the foundation of our city's natural heritage system.  If your property is located either entirely or partially within a ravine protected area, you may be required to apply to the City for a permit prior to undertaking any work that includes the injury or removal of a tree, placing or dumping fill or refuse, or altering the existing grade of land.

city owned trees in a park during summer months

Trees in Parks

The City of Toronto has been called a "city within a park" in recognition of its extensive parks, treed and natural areas.  Urban Forestry is responsible for maintaining approximately 3.5 million trees in parks, ravines and natural areas.  Trees situated on City parkland are protected under the Parks By-law.  This by-law prohibits and regulates certain activities occurring either in or adjacent to City parkland which may impact existing trees.