Construction Projects

Woodbine Avenue Bike Lanes

+ Corley Avenue and Norway Avenue

The City of Toronto is proposing bike lanes on Woodbine Avenue (between O'Connor Drive and Queen Street East). We are also proposing connecting contra-flow bike lanes on Corley Avenue (between Woodbine Avenue and Brookside Drive) and Norway Avenue (between Woodbine Avenue and Elmer Avenue).

News and Updates

Woodbine, Corley and Norway bike lanes are part of in The 10 Year Cycling Network Plan's 2016 Implementation Program to expand and improve Toronto's streets for cycling.  These new bike lanes would provide important connections to the larger cycling network and east end neighbourhoods.

View draft area ward maps of existing and proposed cycling network:

Ward 31 East York

Ward 32 Beaches - East York

The City is considering the following issues and perspectives:

Safety and comfort of cyclists, pedestrians, and drivers
On-street parking available 24/7 on one side of street
Vehicle lane reductions in some areas
No significan changes in vehicle travel times anticipated
TTC bus routes and stops
Emergency services and Wheel-Trans pick-up/drop-off
Curbside garbage collection

PWIC September 27, 2016 Committee Meeting

On September 27th a staff report on the project recommendations was adoped with amendments by the Public Works & Infrastructure Committee (PWIC) under item PW15.10 on the PWIC agenda. The report will be considered by City Council for approval on October 5, 2016.

If endorsed by City Council, the City’s Transportation Services Division would develop an implementation strategy for installation of the cycling facilities on Woodbine Avenue, Corley Avenue and Norway Avenue.  Currently there is no schedule for installation.

Public Consultation Reports

Summary report of public feedack received (PDF)

Online feedback form results

Public Drop-in Events - June 22 & 23, 2016

Two public consultation events were held for this project and the same information was presented at both. The first event took place on June 22, 2016 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Stan Wadlow Clubhouse Community Centre. The second event took place on June 23, 2016 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at St. John the Baptist Norway Church.

Event Flyer (PDF)

Display Panels (PDF)

View Pavement Marking Plans for Proposed Bike Lane Designs on Woodbine Avenue:

View Pavement Marking Plans for Proposed Contra-flow bike lanes:

Woodbine Bike Lanes Email List

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Bike Lane Design Examples

Below are some examples of different design options the City has installed on other streets that could be applied to different sections along Woodbine Avenue.

Standard Bike Lane (St. George St.)
standard bike lane

Protected with Parking & Posts (Hoskin Ave.)
separated bike lane with parking

The following example of a contra-flow bike lane could be applied to Norway Avenue and Corley Avenue.

Contra-flow and Sharrows (Dixon Ave.)

The short URL for this page:

toronto.ca/woodbinebikelanes

ExpandFrequently Asked Questions

Bike Lane Design on Woodbine Avenue. 2

Why is a bike lane being added to Woodbine Avenue?. 2

Will there be physical separation, such as flexi-posts (bollards), curbs or planters?. 2

What is a flexi-post or bollard?. 2

Will the bike lane be wide enough for passing?. 2

Are there plans to extend the Woodbine bike lanes further north along O'Conner Drive and further south to the Waterfront?. 2

Changes to Parking and Traffic. 3

How will the bike lanes effect on-street parking?. 3

Can one side of parking on Woodbine accommodate the needs of residents and businesses?. 3

Won't this push more traffic and parking on to side streets?. 3

What will the effects be on motor vehicle traffic flow?. 4

How will people be picked-up and dropped off from a vehicle at the Woodbine Subway entrance?. 4

How will it work for cars and trucks entering and exiting driveways across the bike lanes?. 4

Contra-flow Bike Lane Design on Corley Avenue and Norway Avenue. 4

What is a contra-flow bike lane?. 4

Why are contra-flow bike lanes being proposed to these streets?. 5

How will parking be affected?. 5

Project Timing and Process. 5

What happens after the June public meetings?. 5

When will it be installed?. 6

How much will this bike lane cost to implement?. 6

Related City Services. 6

Will the bike lane be cleared of snow?. 6

How will bike lanes affect waste pick-up or emergency services?. 6

How will the bike lanes affect the TTC bus stops and Wheel-Trans?. 7

 

Bike Lane Design on Woodbine Avenue

Why is a bike lane being added to Woodbine Avenue?

As part of the Ten Year Cycling Network Plan, the City has identified Woodbine Avenue in the 2016 Implementation program.

A bike lane on Woodbine Avenue would add a significant new bikeway for Toronto's east-end neighbourhoods and would provide connections for cyclists travelling from the Don Valley Trail down to the Waterfront and anywhere in between.

 

Will there be physical separation, such as flexi-posts (bollards), curbs or planters?

Where possible, physical separation would be provided with a wide painted buffer area and flexi-posts in between bike lanes and traffic lanes/parking areas.  Curbside bike lanes would also be buffered by the on-street parking on one side the street, as applicable. Implementation would not involve reconstruction of the roadway and as such only temporary materials would be considered.

 

What is a flexi-post or bollard?

A flexi-post is a post which sticks out of the ground to help separate the bike lane from traffic lanes and parking lanes. Flexi-posts provide added protection and safety to the cyclists by preventing motor vehicles from parking in bike lanes.

 

Will the bike lane be wide enough for passing?

Yes. Generally, we are designing for a 2.0 metre bike lane width for one-way travel which is wide enough for passing but not so wide so as to encourage wrong-way riding.

 

Are there plans to extend the Woodbine bike lanes further north along O'Conner Drive and further south to the Waterfront?

During public consultation for the development of the Cycling Network Plan, we heard concerns from cyclists who ride over the O'Connor Bridge. Maintaining the existing traffic lanes are required to accommodate heavy transit and motor vehicular capacity on O'Connor Bridge.

To improve conditions for cycling on the O'Connor Bridge, painted edge lines (approximately 1.2 metres wide) between Woodbine Avenue and St. Clair Avenue will be installed in spring / summer 2016. The existing traffic lanes will be maintained.

Edge lines are painted white lines that define the limits of the traffic lane. The space in between the edge line and curb is known as the shoulder. Cyclists can use the shoulder space. Cars are not allowed to drive outside the edge lines except in emergency situations.

As part of Toronto's Ten Year Cycling Network Plan, there is a future proposal to extend bike lanes further north/east along St. Clair Avenue from O'Conner Drive to Victoria Park Avenue and further south along Woodbine Avenue between Queen Street East and Lake Shore Boulevard East. You can find out more about these proposals by visiting Toronto Cycling Network Plan.

 

Changes to Parking and Traffic

How will the bike lanes effect on-street parking?

The introduction of bike lanes on Woodbine Avenue would involve some reduction to the amount of on-street parking spaces.  Generally, on-street parking would be maintained 24/7 on the east side of Woodbine Avenue between Queen Street and O'Conner Drive along sections where on-street parking is currently permitted during off-peak hours and weekends only. Bike lanes would be curbside and parking spaces would be moved in between the bike lanes and traffic lanes.

 

Can one side of parking on Woodbine accommodate the needs of residents and businesses?

Parking on the east side of the street can accommodate the current highest parking demand. Current pay-and-display parking on the west side of Woodbine Avenue and between Danforth Avenue and Strathmore Avenue would also be maintained. City staff will meet and review requirements of individual business owners, as required. Existing Wheel-Trans pick-up and drop-off would be accommodated.

 

Won't this push more traffic and parking on to side streets?

The City is currently reviewing the potential impact on local traffic patterns and parking on side streets.  These considerations would be monitored.

 

How will motor vehicle traffic flow be affected?

Bike lanes on Woodbine Avenue would involve a reduction in the number of traffic lanes during the peak periods and would likely result in travel time delay during the morning and evening "rush hour".  Impact on travel time delay would be monitored to inform the project.

 

How will people be picked-up and dropped off from a vehicle at the Woodbine Subway entrance?

Where possible, use of the side street (Strathmore Blvd.) for drop off and pick up would be encouraged.

 

How will it work for cars and trucks entering and exiting driveways across the bike lanes?

The bike lanes would not restrict or limit access to any of the existing driveways or garages along the street. As the details of the bike lane designs are finalized special attention will be given to how we mark and delineate driveways and access points in order to highlight these potential conflict points to all road users. Staff will also consult with concerned property owners during the summer to address access issues involving a particular driveway.

Similar to the busy sidewalks with many pedestrians, motor vehicle drivers will be expected to yield to cyclists and negotiate passage across the bike lanes.

 

Contra-flow Bike Lane Design on Corley Avenue and Norway Avenue

What is a contra-flow bicycle lane?

Contra-flow bicycle lanes allow cyclists to travel in two directions on a street that is one-way for all other vehicles. When travelling in the same direction as other traffic, the cyclist travels in the mixed-use traffic lane.  When travelling in the opposing direction as other traffic, cyclists travel in the designated bicycle lane.  

Making a street two-way for cyclists using this kind of bicycle lane can create valuable neighbourhood connections for cyclists who wish to avoid busy arterial roadways.

 

Why are contra-flow bike lanes being proposed to these streets?

Corley Avenue and Norway Avenue allow for a safer cycling route for cyclist wanting to avoid cycling on Kingston Road. A Corley Avenue bike lane would help provide continuous east-west connection north of Kingston Road.  A Norway Avenue bike lane would help provide continuous east-west connection south of Kingston Road.

 

How will parking be affected?

The only proposed change for Corley Avenue is that permit parking (overnight) and on-street parking would be maintained on the north side of the road with no switching to the south side. There will be no loss to the number of parking spaces.

On Norway Avenue, permit parking (overnight) and on-street parking would be maintained on the south side and the existing number of parking spaces will be maintained.

 

Project Timing and Process

What happens after the June public meetings?

Following public consultation activities, a staff report will be presented to the Public Works & Infrastructure Committee (PWIC). The staff report will include recommendations and public feedback received. The PWIC reviews the staff report and can adopt the staff recommendations or suggest revisions. The outcome of the PWIC review to adopt or revise the study recommendations is then passed on to City Council for their decision. Interested members of the public can arrange to speak with or submit comments in writing to the PWIC.

The following links tell you a little bit more about this process:

City Council & its Committees Learning Guide:
http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=762b6804e1f22410VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD&vgnextchannel=9632acb640c21410VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD#committees

How to have your say:
http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/tmmis/have-your-say.htm

We anticipate that the staff report will be presented to the PWIC in September 2016.

 

When will it be installed?

If City Council adopts the staff report recommendations, installation of the Woodbine Avenue bike lanes could start as early as fall 2016. Depending on the weather and availability of resources, installation of the entire length of Woodbine bike lanes between O'Connor Drive and Queen Street East could be completed by spring 2017.

 

How much will this bike lane cost to implement?

The typical cost for a buffered bike lanes with flexi-posts is about $220,000 per km, but the exact cost can vary depending on the recommended design. The costs include modifications to roadway paint, signage, signal modifications and other temporary measures. These costs are typically very low compared to other transportation infrastructure projects (e.g. transit, bridges, tunnels, road reconstruction).

The length of Woodbine bike lanes is 3.7 km (1.7 km O'Connor Dr. to Danforth Ave. and 2.0 km Danforth Ave. to Queen St. E.) was originally estimated to cost $814,000 however based on more recent cycling facility installations, the cost is now estimated at approximately $400, 000.

The length of Corley contra-flow lanes and sharrows is 400 metres with an estimated cost of $12,000.

The length of Norway contra-flow lanes and sharrows is 200 metres long with an estimated cost of $6,000.

 

Related City Services

Will the bike lane be cleared of snow?

Yes.  Any approved bike lane design would include a maintenance program for snow removal and street cleaning, similar to other popular bike lanes.

 

How will bike lanes affect waste pick-up or emergency services?

The proposed bike lane design would accommodate waste pick-up, emergency services and other municipal services.

 

How will the bike lanes affect the TTC bus stops and Wheel-Trans?

TTC buses will stop at the existing locations and will maintain curbside stop locations. City of Toronto Cycling staff are working with the TTC to accommodate curb-side bus stops, and consideration for Wheel-Trans passenger boarding and unboarding.