BIA List: A-E

Browse through this alphabetical listing and learn more about Toronto's BIAs.

ExpandAlbion Islington Square BIA

Albion Islington Square BIA is a unique shopping district, showcasing a mix of retail shops that specialize in gold jewellery, clothing and textiles, hair and nail salons, grocery stores and restaurants from South Asia and the West Indies along with a variety of other businesses.

This vibrant commercial area is located along Albion Road from Lund Avenue to west of John Grubb Court; north of Calstock Drive to Albion West Plaza and Islington Avenue north of Sandhill Drive to the Bell Canada building; north of Thistletown Multi Service Centre grounds to south of Wardlaw Crescent.

info@albionislingtonsquare.org
416-743-3267


Councillor
Vincent Crisanti, Ward 1

ExpandBaby Point Gates BIA

Established in 2010, Baby Point Gates BIA takes its name from the historic stone gates located at the intersection of Jane and Annette streets. The launching of the BIA has inspired a range of ideas by local merchants to strengthen and enliven these two retail streets. Work currently focuses on marketing, branding and streetscaping the area. Baby Point Gates BIA is well-served by public transit and is intersected by two major roads, which are surrounded by attractive, well-established neighbourhoods. Map
info@babypointgates.ca

Councillor
Sarah Doucette, Ward 13 Profile

ExpandBloor Annex BIA

The Bloor Annex BIA exists to maintain and promote the business community on Bloor Street (between Madison Avenue and Bathurst Street) as a vital part of the City of Toronto. Bordering on the University of Toronto campus, the tree-lined residential area boasts a variety of architectural styles from Victorian to Georgian, and an array of ethnic restaurants, cafés and tea shops, along with yoga and healing arts centres. The Bloor Annex BIA, (formerly the Bloor-Bathurst-Madison BIA) was established in 1995.

Map
bloorannexbiacoord@gmail.com
647-999-7633 

Councillor
Joe Cressy, Ward 20 Profile

ExpandBloor Street BIA

The Bloor Street BIA was established in 2006 to finance the Bloor Street Transformation Project, an ambitious streetscape improvement plan to reinforce Bloor Street’s status as a pedestrian-oriented, premier shopping destination. The Bloor Street Transformation Project involves the reconstruction of Bloor Street between Avenue Road and Church Street to provide wide granite sidewalks, decorative street lighting, new street furnishings, trees, raised planting beds, public art, and new parking lay-bys.

Map
416-928-3553
bybia@bloor-yorkville.com

 

Councillor
Kristyn Wong-Tam, Ward 27 Profile

ExpandBloor West Village BIA

Since 1970 when the Bloor West Village BIA was established as the world’s first BIA, it has steadily maintained its reputation as one of Toronto’s most successful neighborhoods. Today Bloor West Village is widely recognized as one of Toronto’s most popular dining and shopping districts. Along with a great mix of retail shops and restaurants, it also boasts a concentration of distinctive bakeries, delicatessens, tea rooms and coffee shops, several of which offer a tempting array of European specialities.

Other highlights of the area include The Old Mill Inn, a restaurant and banquet hall built in the Tudor style, as well as High Park’s gardens, playgrounds, zoo, walking trails and Grenadier Park. The Bloor West Village proudly presents 2 major city events:  in July it hosts one of the City’s largest outdoor children’s festival and in September it presents the annual Ukrainian Festival, one of North America’s largest. For three days, visitors can sample Ukrainian food, watch performers, dancers and musicians in traditional costumes. Experience the Bloor West Village lifestyle, a small village in a big city!

News Article - PeopleFlow Pilot Keeps Tabs on Returning Shoppers in Bloor West Village

Map
647-729-6963

Councillor
Sarah Doucette, Ward 13 Profile

ExpandBloor by the Park BIA

Cityscape and nature converge in Bloor by the Park BIA, where the shade from a maple tree lends tranquility to your morning latte. Established in 1987 and located along Bloor between Keele and Dundas West, you're never far from "home" when you're visiting Bloor by the Park.  High Park BIA members named Bloor by the Park in honour of its adjacent Toronto landmark, High Park. Renown for its diverse vegetation, wildlife, hiking & bike paths, and spectacular cherry blossom season, High Park was also designated an official site for the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am cycling tournaments. During summertime, Bloor by the Park's sidewalks are lined by lush trees and cascading floral arrangements to mirror the beauty of High Park.


A stroll east of High Park reveals a treasure trove of strong, independent and franchise specialty retailers, restaurants, and medical practices. A number of these are local gems that have surpassed three or more decades in business, but new establishments in recent years have also created loyal followings through their generous hospitality. Find in-house roasted coffee, microbrewery beer selections, fresh fruits, vegetables & flower bouquets, hockey & ski equipment, pinball, Asian cuisine takeout, new and retro video games, pet care & supplies, beauty salons, cobbler repairs, automobile servicing & gas stop, Timbits, Big Macs and more. It's no guess as to why residents are flocking to this main street neighbourhood.

Annual BIA Events, Sightseeing & Fun Facts

Bloor by the Park hosts an annual indoor fair and craft show, Toast to Autumn. What began as a local neighbourhood pub crawl has evolved into an all out family-fun affair. Enjoy performances bysome of Toronto's most talented live bands, savor delicacies from local restaurants, shop in the market, carve a pumpkin, DIY some art, and more.


Beneath the Keele and Bloor underpass is a large scale, newly restored mural creation by artists Rob & Tommy Matejka. Take note, there's more than one way to engage with its dynamic layers. It was revealed on October 25, 2015 and curated with the aid of StreetARToronto.  The back walls of properties from Indian Road to Dundas West (on the north side of Bloor) also
house many more commissioned works of art that are viewed daily by thousands of TTC commuters - don't miss King Kong, and the Midas building!


The Dorval Community Garden is a unique retreat to catch the sunset as subways zip past directly beneath you.

The BIA Chair co-owned one of the first video rental stores in Toronto, opened in 1980, and retired the shop after 34 years. Star personalities such as Martin Short, Andrea Martin, Tedde Moore, Chris Steffler, Bӧrje Salming and others were shop members.  Curtis "CuJo" Joseph, Eddie Belfour and Jason Spezza have been clients of the BIA Secretary's expert hockey repair store.

Getting There

FREE parking along Bloor (between Keele & Dundas West) Monday - Saturday after 6pm, all day Sunday Keele TTC station (bicycle repair stop available)
Dundas West TTC station (PRESTO reload available)
Bloor Station GO/UP Express (PRESTO reload & card purchase available).

Map
info@bloorbythepark.com
(416)824-7741


Councillors

Sarah Doucette, Ward 13 Profile
Gord Perks, Ward 14 Profile

ExpandBloor-Yorkville BIA

The elegant Bloor-Yorkville neighbourhood is home to designer boutiques, spas, restaurants, plush hotels and world class galleries, more than 700 businesses in all. Stroll along quaint laneways and unique side streets, and experience the ultimate fusion of historic charm and modern seduction. Tune into jazz at a café, meet a friend for brunch or shop for the season’s most sought after fashions.

The Bloor-Yorkville BIA spent more than $20 million to improve the streetscape along Bloor, now dubbed “The Mink Mile,” including the planting of 134 beautiful London Plane trees in innovative and sustainable soil cell systems, the widening of its pedestrian-friendly sidewalks dotted with granite benches, the installation of seasonal flowerbeds and attractive up-lighting. The area is also bicycle-friendly by providing bike lanes and 80 bike rings.

The Village of Yorkville Park on Cumberland is another favourite of residents and visitors alike. Created to reflect the various Canadian landscapes, the park features Scot pines and crabapple trees, and nods to wetland and prairie. The park’s 650-tonne granite outcropping, known as “The Rock,” is also a popular landmark.

The Bloor-Yorkville area’s celebrations include Icefest in February, music concerts, artisans’ markets, car shows, beauty and wellness events, among many others. There are also historic walks and gallery tours of the area.

Map
416-928 3553

Councillor
Kristyn Wong-Tam, Ward 27 Profile

ExpandBloorcourt Village BIA

Located along Bloor Street West, from Montrose Avenue to Dufferin, the Bloorcourt Village BIA established in 1979, is well known for its great variety of shops and services catering to all tastes and ages. Visitors can enjoy shopping at musical instrument and supply stores, bridal shops and art galleries, while enjoying the many cafes, bakeries and sports bars. The ethnic mix includes Portuguese, Ethiopian & Eritrean, Greek, Japanese, Korean, Italian, and Jamaican, among others. A well-known attraction is the Long & McQuade Musical Instruments store, a strong supporter of the musical arts community. The annual Bloorcourt Arts and Crafts Fair which takes place in August, spans the BIA’s 12 city blocks and includes extended outdoor patios, arts and crafts vendors, live entertainment and children’s activities.

Map
647-547-8731

Councillors
Ana Bailão, Ward 18 Profile
Mike Layton, Ward 19 Profile

ExpandBloordale Village BIA

Here is a shining example of how people working together in a common cause can make a real difference. An infectious spirit of revitalization and renewal is much in evidence along Bloor Street West between Dufferin and Lansdowne these days, as community leaders, merchants and residents have joined together in an ambitious program to make their neighbourhood a better place to live, work, shop and visit. Bloordale Village Business Improvement Area, founded in 1976, is playing a major role in this endeavour. Restaurants and bicycle shops predominate in this area as do prestigious art galleries and community projects

Enjoy the annual Big on Bloor Festival in July and arts events.

Map

Councillor
Ana Bailão, Ward 18 Profile

ExpandCabbagetown BIA

Standing in the heart of Cabbagetown is like standing at the centre of Canada. For within eyesight you will find a microcosm of everything that defines the country from our history to the multiplicity of sounds and sights. You feel like you're part of a neighbourhood and not just a tourist who has wandered into a prefabricated ”tourist experience.”  Cabbagetown’s current boundaries are now generally accepted as Gerrard Street to the south, Wellesley Street to the north, Sherbourne Street to the west and the Don River to the east. Come see why Cabbagetown is known as “a small town in the heart of a big city.” The Cabbagetown BIA was established in 1982.

Annual events include the Forsythia Festival and the Cabbagetown Festival in September.  To learn more about other events, businesses and services in Cabbagetown please visit our website, www.cabbagetownTO.com and find us on twitter/instagram: @Cabbagetown_BIA or using www.facebook.com/Cabbagetown.TO/. in May and the Festival of the Arts in September.

Map
416-921-0857
bia@cabbagetownTO.com

Councillor
Pam McConnell, Ward 28 Profile

ExpandChinatown BIA

The Chinatown BIA is a vibrant neighbourhood in the centre of Toronto’s downtown. Home to ethnic Chinese immigrants from Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, Vietnam and elsewhere, the intersection of Dundas and Spadina is the focal point of this dynamic community.

Chinatown offers a wealth of Asian shops and a vast selection of authentic Chinese restaurants featuring such delicacies as dim sum. The sidewalks of Chinatown, in particular on weekends, are crammed with fruit stalls, vendors, and thousands of people from all backgrounds eager to shop, eat and socialize.

The large number of restaurants serving fabulous Chinese food is a big attraction to visitors. One would not find the “North American Chinese” menu here. Instead, chefs in the area serve up a variety of truly authentic cuisines from all parts of China, including Cantonese, Szechwan, Hunan and northern China. Residents and visitors alike can purchase fresh ingredients from the stalls lining the streets, and one can wander past dozens of shop windows lined with barbecued pork, duck, steamed buns and other exotic fare.

Visitors to Chinatown will also find a diverse range of shops offering baked goods, herbal medicines, books, videos, household items, and Chinese arts and crafts.

Street signs in the area are written in both English and Chinese, and there are two large shopping malls that cater to the ethnic Chinese — the Dragon City and the Chinatown Centre complex — both are near Dundas and Spadina streets, offering a vastarray of shops and restaurants.

Come to Chinatown and join the local Chinese in experiencing this wonderful piece of Hong Kong, China in downtown Toronto.

Map
administrator@chinatownbia.com
416- 260-9800


Councillor
Joe Cressy, Ward 20 Profile

ExpandChurch-Wellesley Village BIA

The Church-Wellesley Village is a vibrant and diverse community. Historically anchored by the LGBTQ rights movement, the community settled here in what is now known as an international entertainment destination.

The Village is continuing to grow and transition into one of Toronto’s most significant addresses. Located within the central corridor of downtown Toronto, The Village is home to thousands of residents and over 125 businesses all located within 3 city blocks. The Church-Wellesley Village is known for hosting incredible annual events including the Halloween on Church festival in October and the Pride Toronto celebrations in June. Come check it out for yourself!

Map
info@churchwellesleyvillage.ca
416-321-1351

 

Councillor
Kristyn Wong-TamWard 27 Profile

ExpandCollege Promenade BIA

College Promenade is an up-and-coming neighbourhood located on College Street between Shaw Street and Havelock Street, just west of Little Italy. College Promenade was established as a BIA in 2005. The area features more than 100 businesses, including a wide assortment of restaurants, hair and beauty services, and other personal and household services.

Map

Councillors
Ana Bailão, Ward 18 Profile
Mike Layton, Ward 19 Profile

ExpandCorso Italia BIA

As its name proudly proclaims, Italian is the pronounced atmosphere of this neighbourhood. The Corso Italia BIA strip is one of the liveliest parts of St. Clair Avenue located just minutes away from downtown Toronto. Corso Italia stretches along St. Clair Avenue West from just east of Dufferin to just beyond Lansdowne.

Corso Italia on St. Clair is known for its elegant and luxurious shops offering an impressive selection of European-styled high-fashion merchandise. Top-of-the-line fashion shops draw crowds, as do a multitude of cafés, restaurants, trendy gelaterias and cappuccino houses offering the flavours of various Italian regions make it the place to go when you’re in the mood for something with an Italian flavour. Corso Italia has been a BIA since 1983.

This lively neighbourhood often celebrates the Euro Cup Soccer championships attracting thousands of fans to party in the streets. In the month of July, it hosts the Corso Italia Family Festa and Sidewalk Sale.

We invite you to visit us and experience our warm and friendly hospitality!

Map
corso@torontocorsoitalia.com
416-654-3879

 

Councillor
Cesar Palacio, Ward 17 Profile

ExpandCrossroads of the Danforth BIA

The Crossroads at the Danforth BIA represents the area of Danforth Avenue from Victoria Park to Scotia Avenue. We’re here to help create thriving, competitive and safe business areas that attract shoppers, clients, diners, tourists and new businesses to our area. Our mission is to establish a strong and distinct neighbourhood identities that help main streets thrive in a competitive market. Crossroads on the Danforth BIA was established in 2008.

The Crossroads of the Danforth BIA hosts a number of events including a spring cleaning, a tree lighting ceremony-Light Up the Crossroads and the annual summer festival Wheels on the Danforth.

Map
info@crossroadsbia.ca
416-693-8300

Councillor
Michelle Holland, Ward 35 Profile

ExpandDUKE Heights BIA

One of Toronto's largest employment districts, the DUKE Heights BIA is home to 2300 thriving businesses and employs over 30,000 workers. Here you will find plenty of space to run large manufacturing operations, and a strong unified community of business leaders and entrepreneurs.

The DUKE BIA is located at the geographic centre of the GTA and its strategic location is enhanced with great transportation and transit opportunities. Bound by the 407 at the north, the 400 to the west and the 401 to the south, transportation is an ease. The new subway extension into Vaughan has two stops within the BIA, namely Downsview Park Station which interfaces with the GO line, and Finch West Station. Finally, the planned Finch West LRT line begins within the BIA at Finch West Station and will head westward to Humber College with the ultimate goal of connection to Pearson International Airport. Our business area is also near Canada's 3rd largest university, York University, as well as Seneca College, offering unique partnership opportunities and a highly educated and specialized employment base.

Map
info@dukeheights.ca
416-739-1621


Councillor
Anthony Perruzza, Ward 8 Profile

ExpandDanforth Mosaic BIA

Danforth Mosaic BIA established in 2008, is one of the longest BIAs in Toronto, covering an area of 2.9 km along the Danforth from Westlake Avenue on the east to Jones Avenue on the west, representing over 500 local businesses. We call our area The Danny, representative of how our neighbourhood stands out from the world of the mass-produced, the bland and the me-too chains. The Danny is a neighbourhood of things that are real and authentic, where you’ll find a wide range of restaurants, food shops and stores, and behind each of their counters, you’ll find the people who call these places their own.

Map
info@thedanny.ca
416- 875-3760

 

Councillors
Janet Davis, Ward 31 Profile
Paula Fletcher, Ward 30 Profile
Mary Fragedakis, Ward 29 Profile
Mary-Margaret McMahon, Ward 32 Profile

ExpandDanforth Village BIA

Established in 2006, the Danforth Village BIA is located on Danforth Avenue from Westlake Avenue to Victoria Park Avenue. It is a popular and multi-cultural retail district that consists of several large retail chains and more than 200 streetfront stores including specialty food shops, pubs and restaurants The Danforth Village BIA is conveniently accessible by car and by transit via the Main and Victoria Park subway stations, and several streetcar and bus routes.

Danforth Village hosts an annual spring flower show that attracts thousands of visitors from near and far.

The BIA is dedicated to improving the area’s physical appearance, convenience for customers, and economic vitality.

Map
info@dvbia.ca

Councillors
Janet Davis, Ward 31 Profile
Mary-Margaret McMahon, Ward 32 Profile

ExpandDovercourt Village BIA

Small, energetic, community-conscious and ecologically aware; Dovercourt Village BIA began in 1984 and extends north along Dovercourt Road to Dupont St. and continues south from Hallam Street and branches east along Hallam to Ossington. The BIA won an award for placing eight solar powered street lights at the intersection of Dovercourt and Hallam. The street lights have the look of old fashioned, wrought iron gas lamps. Dovercourt Village sports an eclectic mix of shops which include Frank the tailor and his collection of sculptures which festoons Frank’s vintage tailor shop/cleaners interior; Century Drums specializes in the percussion instruments; the Hub Café attracts artists, writers and the new young crowd of neighbours who are making the village a creative hub. Yoga is offered upstairs of the Hub for moms and kids. The two corner vegetable and fruit and variety stores are always selling the most wonderful array of plants and flowers especially at spring planting time. Both customers and bees crowd the shops for access for the best starter plants of tomatoes, cucumbers, basil, beans, herbs and flowers. The bones of the village are apparent with Sone’s pharmacy (still does home deliveries at the time of this writing) at the corner and Progress Bakery across at the other corner. Portuguese is still spoken at the bakery and who can resist those famous Portuguese egg tarts; Easter buns with baked red eggs; and giant flat, donuts (without the hole in the middle) .

Every village has a church. We have the Belarusian Greek Orthodox Church Of St Ephrasinia. We have a public art gallery/studio, Creative Spirit Art Centre which supports artists with disabilities. South Pacific makes and delivers Chinese Foods. Hawaii Bar serves drinks and live music. Vert catering provides vegetarian meals to discerning and famous clients. You can get a tattoo or your chair reupholstered here. This is a village which embraces the diversity of the neighbourhood.

Map
csac@creativespirit.on.ca
416-588-8801


Councillors
Ana Bailão, Ward 18 Profile
Mike Layton, Ward 19 Profile

ExpandDowntown Yonge BIA

Yonge Street, famous as the longest street in the world and boasting some of the highest foot traffic in the city, runs through the core of the Downtown Yonge BIA, established in 2001. As the heart of Toronto, Downtown Yonge is the place to find some of the best business, shopping and entertainment opportunities in the world. The area is bound on the south by Richmond Street, on the north by Grosvenor and Alexander Streets, on the west by Bay Street, and on the east by parts of Victoria, Bond and Church Streets.

Within the area you’ll find several tourist destinations, as well as more than 600 retail stores, 150 bars and restaurants, and eight hotels. Serviced by three subway stations, Queen, Dundas, and College, and offering ample parking, Downtown Yonge is dense with retail and office establishments including the Toronto Eaton Centre, Atrium on Bay, 10 Dundas East, and College Park, and it is teeming with developments and public spaces like Yonge-Dundas Square and Bell Trinity Square. Downtown Yonge is also home to the Canon Theatre, Elgin & Winter Garden Theatre Centre, Massey Hall, several historic buildings and unique parkettes.

Come and join in the excitement that is Downtown Yonge!

Map
416-597-0255
bia@downtownyonge.com

Councillors
Pam McConnell, Ward 29 Profile
Kristyn Wong-Tam, Ward 27 Profile

ExpandDundas West BIA

Considered Reason to Love Toronto #9 by Toronto Life (June 2014), the Dundas West BIA is located along Dundas Street West, in the former Village of Brockton and part of Little Portugal. It covers the area from the CNR tracks just west of Lansdowne Avenue to Rusholme Road (or Lisgar Avenue) to the east and consists primarily of small businesses representing a diverse and healthy commercial mix.  Paragraph 2: Formed in 2006, the Dundas West BIA was driven by a very dedicated and active steering committee consisting of retailers, artists, designers and a landscape architect. This group quickly initiated area improvements, such as the revitalization of the Dundas-St. Clarens parkette and the creation of a series of colourful, vibrant and distinctive murals. Paragraph 3: Award-winning public spaces were created as part of a significant streetscape improvement project in 2012 and in 2013 the BIA partnered with the surrounding community and with neighbouring Little Portugal BIA to create Dundas West Fest, considered by BlogTO to be one of Toronto’s most promising and anticipated street festivals!

Map
DuWestBIA@gmail.com
416-540-6750
204-1457 Dundas Street West,
Toronto, ON, M6J1Y7


Councillor
Ana Bailão, Ward 18 Profile

ExpandEglinton Hill BIA

The Eglinton Hill BIA is located along a charming stretch of Eglinton Avenue West on a hill between Kane Avenue and Bicknell Avenue. Its four blocks are situated in the middle of the city at the crossroads of two major arterial streets Keele Street and Eglinton Avenue West. The BIA is composed of an eclectic mix of shops and services reflecting the diverse heritage of the city. Eglinton Hill BIA was created in 1997.

Map
eglintonhillbia@gmail.com
416-652-0941


Councillors
Frank Di Giorgio, Ward 12 Profile

ExpandEmery Village BIA

Emery Village is named for the historic settlement which developed near what is now Finch Avenue West and Weston Road. The area is bounded by a stable residential community to the west, Highway 400 to the east, Steeles Avenue to the north and Wilson Avenue to the south. Land uses include retail strip malls at the intersection of Finch and Weston and industrial/institutional uses to the north and south.

Created in 2003, Emery Village BIA is home to 2,500 businesses, employing over 25,000 full and part-time employees and is the largest BIA in the City.

Map
416-744-7242
info@emeryvillagebia.ca

Councillor
Giorgio Mammoliti, Ward 7 Profile