Resources

Case Studies

Case Studies highlight the achievements of energy retrofits in Toronto. The case studies feature projects that have had positive environment and economical impacts.  

BBP Case Studies

Expand550 Front Street

Project Address

550 Front Street West,
Toronto, ON M5V 1C1

Key Contacts

Dean Brigham
Terra Energy Management Services Inc.

Project Background

550 Front Street West is a residential complex in downtown Toronto that comprises 196 suites on eight floors. The facility contains a gymnasium, a roof top patio and a private courtyard behind the main tower.

Challenge

The Board of Directors at 550 Front Street sought to enhance resident comfort in the facility, while substantially reducing operating costs. With the goal of maintaining current light levels, increasing resident safety and a long term reduction in operating costs and energy consumption, 550 Front Street, their property manager, and Brookfield Residential Services Ltd. collaborated with Terra Energy Management Services Inc., Enbridge and the City of Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership (BBP) to achieve this goal.

Solution and Results

After conducting a pre-project study into the garage, stairwells, and common area lighting and ventilation systems, the corporation and Terra Energy Management Services developed a program that would upgrade the existing hallway ventilation system with a variable speed drive technology designed to provide for reduced air flow in “off” peak periods of time to substantially reduce the gas consumption in the building.
 
Corridor and stairwell lights were de-lamped based upon foot candle lighting measures taken and garage lighting was retrofitted with new, energy efficient T8 lamps and ballasts for maximized savings. The existing garage exhaust system was operating 24/7 and the installation of a carbon monoxide sensor system now allows the fans to run much less frequently, based upon data logged information.  Both the BBP and Enbridge were consulted to access the energy savings incentives that their programs offer, enabling the Condominium to do more with its budget.
 
The retrofit of the garage lighting and the de-lamping of the corridors and stairwells resulted in a 59.7% reduction in electricity consumption, or 166,114kWh per year. The installation of the variable speed drive on the make-up air unit resulted in a reduction in annual gas consumption for the building by 29.6%, or 20,936 M3 per year.
 
“Overall, the residents will realize a substantial reduction in common element costs through annual utility consumption reductions, along with reduced operational costs on the operating equipment,” added Dean Brigham, Terra Energy Management Services Inc. “With new lamps and ballasts in the garage and removal of excessive lamps in corridors and stairwells, the property management company will realize substantial reduction in operating costs, allowing the savings to be passed along to the residents.”
 
Through joint efforts with Terra Energy Management services, Brookfield has facilitated the identification of over $1.16 million worth of first year savings for their clients.  In total, these projects have accessed over $332,000 in incentive payments and have achieved CO₂ reductions of 204 tonnes.

Project Snapshot

Project Cost: $37,163.50
Annual electricity savings: 166,114 kWh
Annual natural gas savings: 20,936 M3
Annual cost savings: $29,152
Annual CO savings: 204 tonnes
BBP Incentive received:  $13,493.93
Payback period: less than 1 year
 

ExpandBroadway Condominiums

Project Address

Broadway Condominiums
153 Beecroft Avenue
Toronto, ON M2N 7C5
and,
153 and 155 Beecroft Avenue
Toronto, ON M2N 7C6

Key Contact

David Blois
Senior Property Manager

Project Background

Constructed in 2004, Broadway Condominiums is a 750,000 square foot high rise residential condo complex that consists of two buildings: Broadway One and Broadway Two.
Following energy audits conducted in January 2008, Broadway Condominiums observed several opportunities for energy efficient improvements to its buildings that would result in substantial cost savings and, ultimately enhance the homes of the hundreds of residents they serve. Broadway Condominiums acted on the opportunity to make energy efficiency improvements to its ventilation system.

Challenges

Several complaints from residents about too much airflow from fresh air vents in common hallways and very high gas and electrical bills prompted questions about the operational efficiency of the complex. Operational costs, the buildings’ efficiency, maintenance costs, and environmental sensitivities motivated the condo corporation to undergo energy efficiency improvements.
Based on the number of residents (nearly 2,000) and number of suites in the complex (656), the existing ventilation system was over-sized and using more energy than necessary. By considering the three make-up air (MUA) units in the complex – the upper units on the rooftops of each building and the lower unit in the shared parking garage – the amount of delivered air could be reduced, ultimately reducing operational costs. Also, the expected costs to maintain the ventilation system in the shared underground garage were looming.

Solution and Results

Broadway Condominiums teamed up with the City of Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership (BBP) to evaluate the incentives available to offset the costs for their energy conservation efforts for the complex. The MUA unit in the shared underground parking garage and both buildings’ rooftop MUA units have been modified by installing Variable Frequency Drives which reduce the amount of total delivered air, and therefore reducing the amount of energy used to ventilate the buildings. The energy efficiency ventilation retrofits produced a savings of 304,307 kWh in electricity annually. As a result, Broadway Condominiums was awarded over $21,000 in BBP incentives for the successful completion of these three energy efficiency ventilation retrofits.
“The approximate two year projected payback period for lighting retrofits and variable frequency drive installations at this large residential condominium site should have resulted in early approvals, but the very substantial incentives available through the Better Building Partnership solidified the Board’s environmental and fiscal resolve to move forward. The contractors for the projects assisted greatly with the preparation and  submission of the incentive documentation and I was extremely impressed with how efficiently and quickly the applications were then looked after by the Better Building Partnership staff.”
David Blois, Sr. Property Manager, Wilson Blanchard Management Inc.

Project Snapshot

Broadway One - 153 Beecroft
Project cost: $39,700.51
Annual electricity savings: 150,195 kWh
Annual cost savings: $15,019.50
Annual CO2 savings: 144.49 tonnes CO2
BBP Incentives received: $10,513.66

Broadway Two - 155 Beecroft
Project cost: $35,730.46
Annual electricity savings: 154,112 kWh
Annual cost savings: $15,411.20
Annual CO2 savings: 148.26 tonnes CO2

BBP Incentives received: $10,787.85

 

ExpandCentennial College

Project Addresses

Centre for Creative Communications
951 Carlaw Avenue
Toronto, ON M4K 3M2
 
Astonbee Campus
75 Astonbee Road
Toronto, ON M1L 4C9
 
Progress Campus
941 Progress Avenue
Toronto, ON M1G 3T5
 
HP Science and Technology Centre
755 Morningside Avenue
Toronto, ON M1C 5J9

Key Contacts

Tyrone Gangoo
Manager, Plant Services, Facilities & Services, Centennial College

Project Background

Toronto’s Centennial College encompasses four campuses and five satellite locations, representing approximately 1.082 million square feet. Home to some 12,500 full-time and 25,000 part-time students, the college operates 14 hours a day, 6 days per week, for most of the year.
With the majority of its facilities built in the 1970’s and 1980’s, Centennial College was well positioned to reduce their energy costs and carbon footprint through energy efficient retrofits.
Following an energy audit conducted in 2004 by Toronto Hydro Energy Services Inc, several opportunities for improvement were presented that would result in substantial cost savings, including power factor correction and an energy efficient lighting retrofit.

Desired Outcomes

As a publicly funded institution, Centennial College must manage its resources carefully to ensure that facilities are operating as efficiently and as environmentally responsible as possible. With energy prices trending higher and the possibility of significant increases at any time, there is an increased pressure on institutions to reduce the risk of unanticipated future costs. With these things in mind, and a need to not disrupt classes in the process, Centennial College sought to reduce the carbon footprint of its sites and minimize energy operating costs, through energy efficiency upgrades.

Solution and Results

Centennial College evaluated several energy efficiency projects on four campuses, including the cost involved and the time it would take to achieve payback on investment. Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership was consulted to potentially access the energy savings incentives that the program offers, enabling the college to do more with its budget. The projects implemented included:
  • Retrofitting existing T-12 lighting to more energy efficient T-8 technology without sacrificing lighting levels, replacing 4,278 fixtures (mostly HID and incandescent) with higher efficiency alternative fixtures in three campuses and one residence.
  • Introduced ultrasonic occupancy sensors at three sites.
  • At 941 Progress Avenue Campus, converted the fan system to variable frequency drives to better match fan operation to air quality and comfort needs, and replaced the electric hot water heater with a high-efficiency natural gas boiler.
  • Fine-tuned existing Building Automation Systems to optimize efficiency of new measures.
  • Installed capacitor banks to improve power factor at all buildings.
As Tyrone Gangoo, Manager, Plant Services, Facilities & Services, Centennial College points out, “We have an annual energy budget of approximately $2 million and we expect to see savings of about 10% annually from all the implemented improvements – lowering the payback period to just 3.1 years. In addition, we’ve reduced our environmental footprint by 1,420 tonnes of CO2 annually – that’s the equivalent of taking 284 cars off the road.”
The energy efficient upgrades to Centennial College’s facilities resulted in 1,433,608 kWh of annual electricity savings, 19,598 m3 of annual natural gas savings, and an annual greenhouse gas savings of 1,420 tonnes of CO2. These reductions translate into an annual cost savings of $196,055. The payback period of 3.1 years was accomplished with the assistance of a $129,201 incentive received from the Better Buildings Partnership and a $11,951 incentive from Enbridge.
 
All measures were accomplished without any disruption in classes, mainly by taking advantage of summer break. Already the retrofit to newer, more efficient T-8 technology and the introduction of occupancy sensors to better manage lighting use are delivering cost savings as promised.

Project Snapshot

Project cost: $748,594
Annual electricity savings: 1,433,608 kWh
Annual cost savings: $196,055
Annual natural gas savings: 19,598 m3
Annual CO2 savings: 1,420 tonnes
Incentives received: BBP - $129,201 and Enbridge - $11,951
Payback period: 3.1 years
 

ExpandÉcole Saint-Jean-de-Lalande

Project Address

Saint-Jean-De-Lalande School
500 Sandhurst Circle
Toronto, ON M1S 3Y7     

Key Contacts

Bjarne Pedersen
Project Consultant/Engineer
ALD Architectural Lighting Design

Project Background

Saint-Jean-De-Lalande, built in 1973, is a three-storey elementary school, with a student population of 116 students. The school is part of the Roman Catholic separate French language school board for the south-central region of Ontario (CSDCCS). The school board is made up of 41 elementary and eight secondary schools.     

Challenges

Many of the school’s buildings are aging and becoming increasingly inefficient. The school board began to look for ways to increase the school’s energy efficiency to reduce energy costs. Motivated by incentives from the BBP program, the school board undertook an energy efficiency project at Saint-Jean-De-Lalande elementary school.
“The school board is very satisfied with the lighting project completed at Saint-Jean-de-Lalande. This retrofit improved the school’s energy consumption and the quality of learning in the classrooms. The incentives from BBP for this project were very helpful and the school board is now motivated to undertake additional projects with BBP in the future.” 
Nzola Mbaki, Services and Planning Administrator, CSDCCS.

Solution and Results

ALD Architectural Lighting Design conducted a lighting audit, and based on the audit results developed a plan to retrofit the school’s current lighting system. T12 Linear Fluorescent, Incandescent and Metal Halide lamps were retrofitted to a more energy efficient lighting system, including T8 Linear lamps, High Bay T5 Linear lamps and Compact Fluorescent lamps, all complete with electronic ballasts. The retrofit helped to improve the school’s energy consumption, and created a safer and better quality learning environment. In the future, Saint-Jean-De-Lalande plans to install variable frequency drives, photocell lighting and lighting sensors, with the help of BBP incentives.   

Project Snapshot

Project cost: $134,319
Annual electricity savings: 46,008 kWh
Annual cost savings: $46,000
Annual CO2 savings: 44,260 tonnes CO2
BBP Incentives received: $6,652
 

ExpandHumber College

Project Address

Humber College – North Campus
205 Humber College Blvd.,
Toronto, ON M9W 5L7

Key Contacts

Carol Anderson
Director of Facilities, Humber College
Spencer Wood
Manager, Maintenance & Operations, Humber College
Consultant: S.A. Armstrong Ltd

Project Background

Established in 1967, Humber College encompasses three campus locations, representing approximately 2 million square feet. Home to approximately 20,000 full-time, 55,000 part-time and 2,000 apprenticeship students, the college operates 14 hours a day, 6 days per week, for most of the year.
 
With its facilities continually expanding over the last forty years, Humber College has been a leader in Canada in making long-term commitments to reducing energy for the last decade. Since 2001, Humber College has acted on several opportunities to help reduce the school’s energy consumption, including upgrading to a lighting system that uses motion sensor technology, variable speed drives for fan and pump systems.
 
In 2006, S.A. Armstrong Ltd. presented the College with an opportunity that would result in substantial cost savings and reductions in energy consumption at the North Campus, and reinforce Humber College’s status as one of Canada’s greenest schools.

Desired Outcomes

With current energy prices trending higher and the possibility of significant increases at any time, Humber College must manage its resources carefully to ensure that facilities are operating as efficiently and as environmentally responsible as possible.
As a proponent against climate change, there is an increased pressure for Humber College to invest in infrastructure upgrades that will reduce its carbon footprint with lower greenhouse gas emissions. According to Peter Love, Chief Energy Conservation Officer with the Ontario Power Authority, “In Canada, 82 per cent of man-made greenhouse gas emissions results from the production and use of energy.”
 
With the help of S.A. Armstrong Ltd., Humber College sought to reduce the carbon footprint of its North Campus and minimize energy operating costs through an innovative energy efficiency upgrade.

Solution and Results

Humber College developed a $2.8 million program that would see the replacement of the 35-year old chiller system in the North Campus with an innovative system called the Hartman Loop.  They consulted Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership to access the energy savings incentives that the program offers, enabling the College to do more with its budget.
 
The installation of the Hartman Loop at North Campus is the first of its kind in Canada. The System uses three new 550-ton chillers in conjunction with integrated plant control technology that is 50 per cent more efficient than the College’s two former chillers that ran on harmful chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).  The installation of the Hartman Loop will reduce energy consumption during periods of decreased College occupancy, and enable cooling earlier and later in the spring and fall.
The installation of the Hartman Loop chiller system resulted in a drastic reduction of the annual electricity consumption at Humber College’s North Campus by 670,000 kWh. Furthermore, the program is expected to trim utility bills by $104,000 per year. Utilizing $157,600 in financial incentives from the Better Buildings Partnership, Humber College has succeeded in reaching a new standard in fiscal and environmental responsibility with the installation of the Hartman Loop technology.
 
“The existing chiller system was a drain on the environment and our facilities were in serious need of an upgrade,” said Carol Anderson, Humber College’s Director of Facilities. “By replacing the two existing chiller units with the Hartman Loop chiller system, we will reduce our environmental footprint by 645 tonnes of CO2 annually – that’s the equivalent of taking 129 cars off the road, or taking 195 homes off the grid.”

Project Snapshot

Project cost: $3 Million
Annual electricity savings: 670,000 kWh
Annual cost savings: $104,000
Annual greenhouse gas savings: 645 tonnes of CO2
BBP Incentives received: $157,600 (includes some lighting retrofits)
 

ExpandThe Masters Condominium

Project Address

284, 288, 296 and 300 Mill Road
Toronto, ON

Key Contact

Nena Gajic, R.C.M.,
Property Manager, Brookfield Residential Services Ltd.

Project Background

Built in 1972, The Masters comprises two buildings with four municipal addresses. The buildings are honeycomb-shaped complexes of two-storey, split-level and single level suites, housing approximately 1100 residents.
In 2009, The Masters was recognized by the Canadian Condominium Institute (CCI) as a finalist in Condo of the Year award.

Challenges

With 35% of the operating budget devoted to electricity costs, it was clear that the metal halide and T12 lighting systems in the common area of the two buildings needed updating. Metal halide bulbs are also an environmental concern, containing 10 times more mercury than fluorescent bulbs.
With the goal of maintaining current light levels, increased security, safety and a long term reduction in operating costs and energy consumption, The Masters collaborated with supplier and contractor Lighting Solutions and the City of Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership (BBP) to achieve this goal.

Solution and Results

A major pre-project study including the garage, stairwells, and all common area lighting systems was conducted in order to determine if large reductions could be achieved in both kilowatt load and kilowatt-hours without compromising perceived light levels, safety and security. As a result of this study, a decision was made to undertake a full retrofit of the lighting system with the assistance of BBP incentives which significantly improved the rate of return on investment.
The existing HID 50.6 total kW load lighting system from the garage was removed and replaced with a High Efficiency T8 lighting system. This retrofit resulted in a 74% reduction in kilowatt load and a yearly reduction of 291,139 kilowatt-hours.
 
The retrofit also included an update of lighting system in the stairwells, fitness area, meeting rooms and clubhouse, resulting in a yearly reduction of 126,723 kWh. The total electricity savings for the whole project represents taking 80 cars off the road.
 
The goal of this project was savings $40,000 per year, which was surpassed. Completion of this project also resulted in cash savings and a benefit to the environment.
 
“As managers of condominiums, we are working within a non-profit environment.  The owners’ maintenance fees are the only source of budget income.  Our ongoing mandate is to find ways to reduce operating costs,” said Nena Gajic, property manager.  “We knew a lighting retrofit proposal with less than 2 year payback, substantial reduction in future operating costs and a generous BBP incentive to boot would be a welcome winner!”

Project Snapshot

Project Cost: $87,486
Annual electricity savings: 417,852 kWh
Annual electricity demand savings: 47.7 kW
Annual cost savings: $41,785
Annual CO2 savings: 402 tonnes
BBP Incentive received: $20,892.61
Annual ROI: 57%
Payback period: less than 2 years

ExpandMount Sinai Hospital

Project Address

Joseph and Wolf Lebovic Health Complex
600 University Avenue
Toronto, ON M5G 1X5

Key Contact

Altaf Stationwala
Senior Vice President, Operations and Redevelopment
 Mount Sinai Hospital

Project Background

Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH) is one of Canada’s leading academic health science centres affiliated with the University of Toronto. It is recognized internationally for its excellence in the provision of compassionate patient care, innovative teaching and research. MSH has taken a leadership role in environmental sustainability, and has made a commitment to reduce its environmental footprint through energy conservation and a reduction of energy use.

Desired Outcomes

After almost 35 years, the Hospital’s conventional chiller was due to be replaced. When MSH looked at the cost and environmental impact of a new conventional system versus Enwave’s deep-lake cooling system, the business case was clear. A 20-year forecast revealed that energy costs using chillers would reach $13.5 million; whereas the cost of using Enwave is $10 million – an accumulated cost savings of $3.5 million.

Solution and Results

To achieve the goal of energy conservation and reduction, MSH converted to the Enwave Deep Lake Water Cooling (DLWC) program, providing participants with chilled water through an underground piping distribution network, instead of cooling their buildings with in-house chillers.
The primary challenge with this project was the installation of the revised chilled water piping that was required for the system changeover. MSH’s chillers and cooling towers are located on the top of the building, while the Enwave heat exchanger had to be installed in the base of the building.
It was not possible to create an interior piping route from the top of the building to the basement. As a result, Mount Sinai installed a new exterior shaft along the south face of the building in order to run the piping from the chillers and cooling towers down to the heat exchanger.
By removing the chillers and converting to DLWC, MSH will achieve significant economic and environmental savings. The costs of purchasing new transformers and the replacement costs of chillers will now be avoided, resulting in savings of about $600,000. By converting to DLWC, MSH is helping to free up over 61 megawatts of electricity from the city’s electrical grid, equal to the energy needed for 6,800 homes annually. Over the next 20 years, the conversion will result in $3.5 million in energy cost savings.
Removing the chillers from the facility has created additional space for infrastructure upgrades, now being used to house energy power diesel generators; a critical upgrade that would not have been possible without removing the chillers. Removing the chillers also reduces the amount of waste produced by MSH, with no need to dispose of the unit at the end of its useful life. BBP provided an added incentive to Mount Sinai Hospital’s Enwave project, helping to ease the initial investment in the Enwave technology, giving the Hospital a one-time grant of over $722,000.

Project Snapshot

Project cost: $6,077,431
Annual electricity savings: 2,400,000 kWh
Annual CO2 Savings: 2,309 tonnes
BBP incentives received: $722,693

ExpandSunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Bayview Campus

Project Address

Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Bayview Campus
2075 Bayview Avenue
Toronto, ON M4N 3M5

Key Contacts

Laura Bristow, Communications Advisor
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Project Background

As a teaching hospital, Sunnybrook leads by innovation and learning in both their medical practices and the maintenance of their three campuses. Sunnybrook’s environmental principles are part of the organization’s corporate culture.

Desired Outcomes

In an effort to reduce the hospital’s environmental impact and to create safer, more comfortable conditions for patients, staff, and visitors and a greener Toronto, a comprehensive energy efficient retrofit plan was developed for the Bayview Campus. Also, with increasing pressures on the cost of patient care, there was a desire to reduce non-patient care costs such as energy operating costs.

Solution And Results

To help cut operational costs and utility expenses, and reduce environmental impact, Sunnybrook teamed up with Honeywell Energy Solutions to implement a $28 million facility renewal program. The renewal program included the installation of new lighting and heating, ventilation and cooling equipment, and has ongoing plans to make improvements to mechanical and building automation systems.
Sunnybrook also accomplished an innovative solar photovoltaic installation. More than 140 solar panels spanning two stories of a parking garage were installed and are expected to generate nearly 27,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity annually – enough energy to power 150 medical ventilators. Serving as a visual reminder of the hospital’s commitment to conserving energy, and producing clean renewable energy, the solar panels are mounted vertically on the wall of the parking garage. In addition, a display near the parking garage educates visitors and staff on photovoltaic technology, and provides real-time information on power generation and carbon emissions reduction.
Sunnybrook engaged with the City of Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership to determine the availability of zero interest loans through the City’s Sustainable Energy Funds (SEF) and incentive grants through BBP’s Energy Conservation program. Since the overall project included both energy conservation measures and a renewable energy installation, the hospital was able to arrange loans through both available SEF loan funds – the Toronto Energy Conservation Fund and the Toronto Green Energy Fund to a total of $1.78 million, in addition to BBP incentives of almost $960,000 for energy savings achieved.
Upon completion, the facility renewal program is expected to result in cost savings of approximately $2.6 million per year and reduce annual greenhouse emissions by an estimated 10,000 tonnes, the equivalent of taking over 2,000 cars off the road per year.

Project Snapshot

Energy Conservation
Project Cost: $26,400,000
Annual electricity savings: 10,500,000  kWh
Electricity demand reduction: 787 kW
Annual cost savings: $2.6  million
Annual CO savings: 10,000 tonnes
BBP Incentives received: $960,000
Toronto Energy Conservation Fund zero interest loan: $1 Million
Simple Payback: 10 years
 
Solar Panels
Project Cost: $1,605,000
Annual electricity generated: 111,500 kWh
Annual ‘Feed in Tariff’ revenue: $80,000 approx
Toronto Green Energy Fund zero interest loan: $787,000
Simple Payback: 20 years

ExpandToronto Catholic District School Board

Project Address

80 Sheppard Avenue East
Toronto, ON M2N 6E8

Key Contact

Mary Walker
Communications Supervisor
Main Building Contact:
Rose MacDonald
Supervisor TCDSB Central Services

Project Background

Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB) governs 208 schools in the Toronto area including 30 secondary and 178 elementary schools. In total there are 15,365 full-time equivalent teachers and 94,936 students enrolled in TCDSB schools.
 
TCDSB wanted to reduce operating costs and become a more energy efficient school board by making environmental changes in various schools. And with many of the schools dating back to the 1950’s, many of the existing technologies and infrastructures were old and out of date.
In 2007, a lighting audit was conducted by ALD Architectural Lighting Design who designed an implementation plan to upgrade the existing lighting. TCDSB reached out to the City of Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership to access information and resources to support their energy efficient lighting retrofits.

Challenges

With all schools fully operational, TCDSB wanted to ensure students’ schedules and environments were not disturbed. With these challenges in mind, TCDSB sought to reduce the carbon footprint of its combined campuses and minimize energy operating costs by upgrading their lighting systems.
 
“By working together with the BBP to upgrade parts of our lighting systems in multiple schools and portables, we expect to see savings of about 25% annually, lowering the payback period to just 3.5 years.” Rose MacDonald, Supervisor TCDSB Central Services

Solution

Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership was involved in supporting the TCDSB to access the energy savings incentives that the program offers, enabling the school board to do more with its budget and improve the lighting in more schools. The existing lighting consisted of T12 linear fluorescents, incandescent and halogen lamps. The aim of the retrofit plan was to upgrade to an energy efficient lighting system including T8 linear fluorescents lamps complete with electronic ballasts, compact fluorescents and high pressure sodium lighting. The projects implemented include:
  • Replacement of T12 with T8, and incandescent with CFL in seven schools
  • Replacement of T12 with T8 in one school and 139 portable classrooms
  • Replacement of T12 with T8, incandescent with CFL, and Halogen with HPS in one additional school
 
“By working together with the BBP to upgrade parts of our lighting systems in multiple schools and portables, we expect to see savings of about 25% annually, lowering he payback period to just 3.5 years", said Rose MacDonald, Supervisor, TCDSB Central Services. “Not to mention, we’ve reduced our environmental footprint by 750,000Kg of CO2 annually – equivalent to taking 150 cars off the road.”

Results

The energy efficient upgrades to 264,536 sqft of TCDSB facilities resulted in 84,535 kWh of annual electricity savings and an annual greenhouse gas savings of 562,323 kg of CO2. These reductions are expected to provide an annual cost savings of $58,453 with a payback period of 3.86 years. These savings were accomplished with the support of a $68,927.00 incentive payment from the Better Buildings Partnership.
All measures were accomplished without any disruption to classes by ensuring all work was conducted in the evenings.

Project Snapshot

Project cost: $294,500
Annual electricity savings: 584,535 kWh
Annual cost savings: $58,453
Annual CO2 savings: 562,323 kg of CO2
BBP Incentives received: $68,927

ExpandToronto East General Hospital

Project Address

825 Coxwell Avenue
Toronto, ON M4C 3E7

Key Contact

Betty Best
Project Manager, Toronto East General Hospital

Project Background

Toronto East General Hospital (TEGH) is a large urban community teaching hospital serving a diverse, multi-cultural population of 400,000, representing over 45 cultural and linguistic groups in East Toronto. Home to 2,600 employees, and 400 physicians and midwives, TEGH annually admits 20,000 acute care inpatients, delivers 3,500 babies, has over 60,000 emergency visits and provides service to over 220,000 outpatients.
 
Originally built in 1929, TEGH has grown from a 110-bed general hospital to a 515-bed full service healthcare facility. After 80 years of expansion, TEGH was ready for an infrastructure renewal program that would significantly reduce energy and water consumption.
 
In 2006, the TEGH partnered with Honeywell to begin an extensive energy savings and facility renewal program, centered on infrastructure upgrades that would reduce its carbon footprint, resulting in substantial cost savings.

Desired Outcomes

As a publicly funded institution, TEGH must manage its resources carefully to ensure that its facilities are operating as efficiently as possible. Faced with an aging infrastructure, and utility prices trending higher, (with the possibility of significant increases at any time) there is an increased pressure on institutions to reduce the risk of unanticipated future costs.
 
We started out with the goal of improving our facilities while being fiscally and environmentally responsible,” said Rob Devitt, President and CEO, Toronto East General Hospital.
With the help of Honeywell, TEGH wanted to develop a program that would use the energy cost savings to pay for the work, creating a self-funded renewal program with minimal risk.

Solution and Results

TEGH developed a $9.5-million (CDN) energy savings and facility renewal program, centered on infrastructure upgrades that will help the hospital reduce energy and water consumption. Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership and Toronto Water were consulted to potentially access the energy and water savings incentives that the programs offer, enabling the hospital to do more with its budget. The projects implemented included:
  • Power quality improvements
  • Lighting redesign
  • Variable speed drives on cooling towers
  • Improved building envelope
  • Replacement of leaky steam traps
  • Chiller plant upgrade
  • Replacement of plumbing fixtures
  • Replacement of medical vacuum pumps
  • New boiler draft controls
  • Installation of a new building automation system (BAS)
“The program is going to save a substantial amount of energy and water annually — a major achievement for the hospital,” adds Devitt. “The program is expected to trim utility bills by $880,000 per year while creating a better, more modern environment for our patients, physicians and staff. In addition, we’ve reduced our environmental footprint by nearly 3,000 tonnes of CO2 annually – that’s the equivalent of taking 475 cars off the road.”
 
The energy efficient upgrades to the hospital’s facilities resulted in 3,108,335 kWh of annual electricity savings, and an annual greenhouse gas savings of nearly 3,000 tonnes of CO2. By replacing plumbing fixtures and medical vacuum pumps, as well as eliminating city water waste in the cooling equipment, the hospital will save 114,471 m3 of water annually; enough water to fill about 40 Olympic-size swimming pools.
 
In reducing annual utility costs and utilizing financial incentives of $241,901 from the Better Buildings Partnership, $130,538 from Toronto Water and $47,000 from Enbridge, TEGH has succeeded in lowering the payback period to just 9.5 years, reaching a new standard in fiscal and environmental responsibility.
Project Snapshot
Project cost: $9.5 Million
Annual electricity savings: 3,108,335 kWh
Annual cost savings: $880,000
Annual CO2 savings: nearly 3,000 tonnes of CO2
Annual water savings: 114,471 m3
Incentives received: BBP ($241,901); Toronto Water ($130,538); Enbridge ($47,000)
Payback period: less than 10 years

ExpandTyndale University College & Seminary

Project Address

25 Ballyconnor Court
Toronto, ON M2M 4B3

Key Contact

Scott Rough
Manager, Campus Operations

Project Background

Tyndale University College & Seminary is a trans-denominational, evangelical university college offering certificates and bachelor’s degrees in humanities, social sciences and business; while the seminary offers master’s and doctoral degrees in divinity and theology. With much of the campus comprising of older buildings built in the 1960’s and 1970’s, Tyndale wanted to reduce operation costs and become a more energy efficient campus.
After a lighting audit was conducted by Trace Electric, it was clear that there were opportunities for improvement. Tyndale College contacted the City of Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership to access information and resources for their lighting retrofit projects.

Challenges

Tyndale College sought to undertake projects to reduce the carbon footprint of its buildings and minimize energy operating costs by upgrading their outdated lighting system without disrupting classes and student life.

Solution

The Better Buildings Partnership played an important role in helping Tyndale University College access energy savings incentives, enabling it to do more with its budget. The existing lighting consisted of T12 linear fluorescents, incandescent and metal halide lamps. The College’s plan included switching to an energy efficient lighting system including T8 linear fluorescents lamps complete with electronic ballasts, compact fluorescents and LED exit signs. The project implemented include:
  • Gymnasium lighting upgrade – light retrofit: metal halide to T8 Fluorescent High Bay Lighting
  • Lighting upgrade – light retrofit: T12 Fluorescent, incandescent to T8 Fluorescent, Compact florescent, LED Exit Signs
“The upgrades that we implemented to our lighting system are expected to deliver a savings of about 34% annually, lowering the payback period to just 5.63 years”, said Scott Rough, Manager of Campus Operations at Tyndale College.” Not to mention, we’ve reduced our environmental footprint by about 185,884 kg of CO2 annually – that’s the equivalent of taking 41 cars off the road. These projects were made possible with the help of the Better Buildings Partnership.”

Results

The energy efficient upgrades to Tyndale University College facilities resulted in 213,214 kWh of annual electricity savings and an annual greenhouse gas savings of 205112 kg of CO2. These reductions provide an annual cost savings of $21,321. The payback period of 5.63 years was accomplished with the support of a $36,592.00 incentive received from the Better Buildings Partnership.
“The upgrades that we implemented to our lighting system are expected to deliver a savings of about 34% annually, lowering the payback period to just 5.63 years.” Scott Rough, Manager of Campus Operations at Tyndale College.

Project Snapshot

Project cost: $156,628
Annual electricity savings: 213,214 kWh
Annual cost savings: $21,321
Annual CO2 savings: 205,112 kg of CO2
BBP Incentives received: $46,592
Project results have been verified by a third party project evaluator according to industry references and the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP).

ExpandUniversity of Toronto

Project Addresses

Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1V6
Medical Science Building
1 King’s College Circle
Toronto, ON M5S 1A8
 
Dentistry Building
124 Edward Street
Toronto, ON M5G 1X3
 
64 facilities at the St. George Campus Simcoe Hall
27 King’s College Circle
Toronto, ON, M5S 1A1

Key Contacts

Ron Swail
Assistant Vice President, Facilities & Services, University of Toronto
Bruce Dodds
Director of Utilities & Building Operations, University of Toronto

Project Background

Comprising approximately 11 million square feet, University of Toronto’s 180-year-old campus encompasses over 120 buildings averaging 77 years of age.  When a chiller failure led  to the closure of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto one hot summer day in 2004, capital constraints could no longer justify deferring the replacement of the 36-year-old-unit. Recognizing that the breakdown at OISE was a symptom of a much bigger problem, a comprehensive campus-wide retrofit plan was developed.

Challenges

The project strategically paired an essential cooling system upgrade with a major lighting retrofit. Environmental concerns were at issue as some of the existing light fixtures had the original electromagnetic ballasts, possibly containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).
 
18 chillers on campus exceeded their rated service life by 10 to 20 years and had become increasingly expensive to maintain and repair. Moreover, all of the units used a substance containing ozone-layer-damaging chlorofluorocarbons, which posed an environmental liability. A widespread upgrade was urgently required.

Solution and Results

The University accomplished two major deferred maintenance projects valued at nearly $20 million, while providing a continuing positive cash flow to the operating budget through energy savings and savings on maintenance. When incentives from City of Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership ($467,745.60) and Natural Resources Canada ($250,000), along with a $1.8 million zero interest loan from the City of Toronto’s Sustainable Energy Funds (also through Better Buildings Partnership) were factored in, the combined projects carried an overall payback of 14 years.
 
The chiller retrofits resulted in annual cost savings of $330,000 and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of approximately 800 tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year.
 
The lighting upgrade translated into annual cost savings of approximately $970,000 and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 11,544 tonnes of CO2 per year.

Project Snapshot

Annual electricity savings: 12 GWh
Annual cost savings: $1.3 million
Annual CO2 savings: 11,544 tonnes
Annual peak electrical demand reduction: 4.2 megawatts (MW) (10 to 15 per cent of the campus load)
Incentives received: BBP $467,745.60; Natural Resources Canada $250,000; Toronto Sustainable Energy Funds $1.8 million as zero interest loan
 

ExpandUniversity Healthcare Network

Project Address

190 Elizabeth Street
Toronto, ON M5G 2C4

Key Contact

Ed Rubinstein
Manager, Energy and Environment

Project Background

University Healthcare Network is comprised of four well known Toronto hospitals: Toronto General, Toronto Western, Princess Margaret and Toronto Rehab. Located in Toronto these hospitals have achieved global recognition for their exemplary patient care, research and education.
“Greening health care is no small matter at University Health Network (UHN). Led by Ed Rubinstein of the Energy and Environment department, UHN has been breathing life into the UHN motto: Committed to Patient and Planet Centered Care. Since adopting an environmental management system in 2000, their environmental programs frequently break new ground, testing out ideas and innovations that are new to health care and beyond.”
Managing energy usage in hospital buildings provides an amazing opportunity to help the environment, receive an economic benefit of decreased utility costs and most importantly offer a better social experience for patients. As patients, employees and visitors can attest, a pleasant hospital atmosphere increases patient health and well being.

Challenges

With the aging of the Toronto General Hospital’s outdoor neon signage, the hospital sought to find a sustainable economic lighting solution. The appropriate system would need to provide the hospital with signage that represents the hospital’s image and remain maintenance free, to provide saving from costly and difficult bulb replacements.

Solution

UHN sought the Better Buildings Partnership’s help to receive the OPA sponsored incentive for changing their exterior lighting. Using innovative LED lighting UHN replaced their Neon Signage with an LED string, reducing consumption to 1/W a foot providing the hospital with three levels of results:
  • Economic savings: Reduced energy usage by almost 90%
  • Decreased environmental impact of almost 7.5 tonnes of carbon
  • Social impact from increased buildings appeal, due to the new bright signage
"The retrofits achieved an impressive 90% in energy savings providing UHN with a long term continued savings from their investments Using LEDs will also provide UHN with additional savings from maintenance costs thus increasing the payback for this project. The BBP played a key role in helping us submit our OPA incentive application. Their assistance in collecting and submitting the necessary information ensured that our application was successful which, in turn, allowed us to put our incentive towards other energy efficiency initiatives."
Ed Rubinstein, Manager, Energy and Environment, University Health Network

Project Snapshot

Project cost: $22,000
Annual electricity savings: 44,000 kWh
Annual cost savings: $4,400
Payback: 4.5 years
Annual CO2 savings: 7.5 tonnes
BBP, Toronto Hydro, OPA sponsored financial incentives: $2,500
Project results have been verified by a third party project evaluator according to industry references and the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP).

ExpandUpper Canada College

Project Address

200 Lonsdale Road
Toronto, ON M4V 1W6

Key Contacts

Stephen Thuringer
Director of Facilities, Upper Canada College
Peter Colasante
Operations Manager, Upper Canada College

Project Background

Located in the heart of Toronto, Upper Canada College (UCC) is a 181-year-old independent boys school. The UCC campus is set on 38.5 acres, comprising more than 500,000 sq feet of mixed-use space in 16 buildings, built between 1898 and 2008. The campus includes a twin-pad arena, swimming pool, three gyms and seven sports fields. UCC has a student population of 1,156 with 86 boarders and 16 families living on-campus. The 16 buildings are a challenge to upgrade and retrofit for increased energy efficiency due to the wide range in age and various construction types.

Challenges

 To assist in addressing these challenges, UCC launched its Green School Master Plan in 2001, to renew its facilities while improving energy performance and reducing its environmental footprint as well as integrating sustainability and environmental stewardship into the school’s culture and curriculum.
During the first two years of UCC’s Green School program, many small energy efficiency projects were completed, but it became necessary to focus on larger projects requiring outside sources of funding.

Solution and Results

UCC sought the assistance of the Better Buildings Partnership’s (BBP) MASH program for its larger projects. BBP was a valuable resource for UCC in both quantifying a project’s immediate impact on energy consumption and providing financial support to enable the various projects.
UCC has worked with BBP to complete numerous energy efficiency projects, to assist with its commitment to its Green School Master Plan. UCC’s hockey arena and sports complex was designed to be sustainable, and is working towards gold-level LEED certification. To reduce energy consumption from heating in the arena and sports complex, UCC installed geothermal heating beneath a nearby playing field, which provides the heat supply for the arena and sports complex. Geothermal heating assists in reducing the complex’s energy use by 35 to 40 per cent annually.
BBP also assisted UCC in completing a number of energy efficiency projects, including the replacement of the 1000-watt metal halide lights with 400-watt metal halide lights for three of the school’s gymnasiums. This resulted in reducing energy use by more than 50 per cent. UCC has also undertaken other energy efficient projects, such as the installation of compact fluorescents, LED Lighting, occupancy sensors, and has converted its electric hot water heaters to natural gas hot water heaters. As well, the school installed variable frequency drives and implemented energy efficient rooftop heating and cooling units.
“The BBP helps identify potential projects, clarifies the scope of the work, assists in filing the applications, verifies the outcome and provides resources to offset costs,” said Stephen Thuringer, Director of Facilities, UCC. “They are truly a unique enabler for environmental projects that benefit our entire community and beyond.”
With its ongoing commitment to the Green School Master Plan, UCC looks forward to completing further green projects with BBP. 

Project Snapshot

New Construction & Geothermal Heating
Project cost: $300,000
Annual electricity savings: 946,809 kWh
Annual cost savings: $123,241
Annual CO2 savings:  555.13 tonnes CO2
BBP Ground Source Heat Pump Incentive: $50,560
BBP New Construction Incentive: $44,040.50
Total New Construction Incentives: $94,600.50
Domestic Hot Water Conversion (Electric to Gas), Variable Frequency Drives, Occupancy Sensors, Energy Efficient Roof Top Replacement and Lighting Retrofit
Project cost: $306,600
Annual electricity savings: 1,322,999 kWh
Annual cost savings: $132,299
Annual CO2 savings:  1,273 tonnes CO2
Estimated BBP Incentives: $ 113,542

 

ExpandVictoria University

Project Address

Victoria University (main building)
91 Charles Street West
Toronto, ON M5S 1K6

Key Contacts

David Prediger
Manager, Maintenance and Grounds

Project Background

Victoria University was founded in 1836, and in 1890 federated with the  University of Toronto. In 1892, Victoria University moved from Cobourg to its  current campus in Toronto. Victoria University is home to approximately 3,500  undergraduate students. The campus consists of 14 buildings, some dating  back to the 19th century, with the most recent building completed in 2001.     

Challenges

Due to the age of most of the buildings, inefficiencies were growing and Victoria University was looking for ways to increase the energy efficiency of the buildings and reduce energy costs.
“Incentives from the BBP will enable the university to plan and implement valuable projects which would not have been possible before this program was available”, David Prediger, Manager of Maintenance and Grounds, Victoria University. 

Solution and Results

A detailed energy audit was conducted on all 14 buildings, which will result in a major lighting retrofit project for the Victoria University campus. The project includes retrofitting existing T12 Linear Fluorescent fixtures with 25 Watt T8 Linear florescent lamps and electronic ballasts, replacing 32 Watt T8 linear fluorescents fixtures with 25 Watt T8 Linear fluorescent lamps and replacing metal halide fixtures with induction lamp fixtures. The university will also install motion sensors in classrooms, washrooms, garbage chute rooms and in some common areas.
The retrofits will assist in reducing energy consumption and expenses. The new lights will be brighter and more efficient than the old lights; and greatly enhance the aesthetics of the buildings and rooms.
“Incentives from the BBP will enable the university to plan and implement valuable projects which would not have been possible before this program was available,” said David Prediger, Manager of Maintenance and Grounds, Victoria University. “The university appreciates all of the services offered by the BBP and has found them to be a valuable resource in our attempts to reduce our energy consumption.”
The university is currently in the process of implementing some lighting retrofits as well as completing new heating and cooling systems which incorporate variable drives for pumps and air handling units.

Project Snapshot

Project cost: $529,935
Annual electricity savings: 876,533 kWh
Annual cost savings: $87,653
Annual CO2 savings: 843 tonnes CO2
BBP Incentives: $70,981.35 (estimated)
 

ExpandVilla Charities

Project Addresses

Villa Charities Inc. - Head Office
901 Lawrence Avenue West
Toronto, ON M6A 1C3
Caboto Terrace
3050 Dufferin Street
Toronto, ON M6B 3T5
 
Casa DelZotto
3010 Dufferin Street
Toronto, ON M6B 3T4
 
Casa Abruzzo
338 Falstaff Avenue
Toronto, ON M6L 3E7

Key Contacts

Joe Gianna
Property and Operations Manager, Villa Charities Inc.

Project Background

Established in 1971, Villa Charities Inc. is an organization created to meet the needs of an ever-growing multicultural community in the Greater Metropolitan Toronto Area. In addition to providing culturally sensitive care for the elderly, the Villa Charities family of organizations is also committed to providing homes that offer independent and assisted living to seniors and adults with intellectual disabilities.
 
Following energy audits conducted in 2008, Villa Charities observed several opportunities for energy efficiency improvements to its buildings that would result in substantial cost savings; and, ultimately enhance the homes of the hundreds of senior citizens they serve.  Villa Charities embarked on energy efficiency lighting retrofit programs for three of its buildings:  Caboto Terrace, Casa DelZotto and Casa Abruzzo.
 
This approach and planned energy conservation program included facilitating two separate energy efficient lighting retrofits conducted by Enerlights at the Casa Abruzzo facility.

Desired Outcomes

Growing concern about the environment and steadily rising energy costs have made effective energy management in multi-residential buildings more important than ever before.
To continue to carry out its mission to provide culturally sensitive care and residence for seniors in the Greater Toronto Area, Villa Charities’ family of organizations need to carefully manage the significant costs associated with operating and maintaining its facilities. In addition, maintaining environmentally sound operations enhances and preserves the asset value of the buildings and demonstrates Villa Charities’ environmental stewardship.

Solution and Results

Villa Charities embarked on lighting retrofit programs for Caboto Terrace, Casa DelZotto and Casa Abruzzo, with the aim of learning from these initial retrofits so that further energy plans could be developed and implemented in other buildings.
Villa Charities teamed up with the City of Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership to evaluate the incentives available to offset the costs for their energy conservation efforts for the three buildings.
Combining the energy efficiency lighting retrofits of the three buildings, nearly 10,000 lighting fixtures were upgraded, saving 2,300,194.80 kWh in electricity annually.
 
Some of highlights for the electricity enhancements included:
  • Retrofitting existing 60W incandescent bulbs to more energy efficient 26W Landlite CFLs in the suites at Casa DelZotto
  • Upgrading the in-suite lighting of the bathrooms at Casa Abruzzo from 60W incandescent bulbs to new fixtures featuring 4 Landlite 9W ELG’s
  • Retrofitting Caboto Terrace’s stairwell, ground floor and hallways from 2 – 32W T8 electronic ballasts with higher efficiency alternative 28W T-5 fixtures
 
As a result, Villa Charities was awarded $96,000 in BBP incentives for the successful completion of these three energy efficiency lighting retrofits.
 
Three energy efficiency lighting retrofits at Villa Charities’ buildings were successfully implemented and the resulting reduction in greenhouse gas emissions achieved through energy conservation is equivalent to removing 443 cars from the road annually.
The retrofits will result in annual savings of hundreds of thousands of dollars in operating costs for Caboto Terrace, Casa DelZotto and Casa Abruzzo, and will allow Villa Charities to demonstrate environmental stewardship and contribute to building a healthy and clean city.  In addition, working with the City of Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership allowed Villa Charities to fulfill their plans and continue to plan for the future.
 
“Villa Charities’ commitment to the community spans almost 40 years and is rooted in providing care and services to seniors, adults with intellectual disabilities and the general community in ways that strengthen and uphold Italian customs and traditions,” said Palmacchio Di Iulio, President and CEO, Villa Charities Inc.  “We welcome opportunities to partner with other community and governmental groups, such as the Better Buildings Partnership, to find innovative ways to make our service delivery better.  We are proud to be able to offer culturally-sensitive programs and services at Caboto Terrace, Casa DelZotto and Casa Abruzzo that are now environmentally friendly and economically sound.”

 

Project Snapshots

Caboto Terrace
Project cost: $71,736.00
Annual electricity savings: 1,072,434.20 kWh
Annual CO2 savings: 1,032 tonnes
BBP Incentives received:  $29,062.00

 

Casa DelZotto
Project cost: $73,163.00
Annual electricity savings: 253,999 kWh
Annual CO2 savings: 244 tonnes
BBP Incentives received: $28,000.00

 

Casa Abruzzo
Project cost: $106,260.00
Annual electricity savings: 973,761.60 kWh
Annual CO2 savings: 937 tonnes
BBP Incentives received: $40,075.00
 

ExpandWest Park Healthcare Centre

Project Address

82 Buttonwood Avenue
Toronto, ON M6M 2J5

Key Contacts

Michael Bonnah
Director Operations and Logistics

Project Background

Toronto’s West Park Healthcare Centre began its journey to improve energy efficiency on the 27-acre campus of its rehabilitation, complex continuing care and long-term care facility in 1986. The hospital provides 487 beds to patients who are overcoming health barriers, to help them live the fullest lives possible. West Park employs 920 healthcare staff, and operates 24 hours a day, seven days per week.
 
With its ongoing commitment to energy conservation, West Park was interested in additional ways to reduce its electrical demand and environmental footprint through energy-efficiency retrofits. Following an engineering review in 2008 conducted by HH Angus and Associates, an opportunity to improve the cooling system was presented that would garner significant savings.
 
The engineering study revealed the need to replace an outdated, 30-year-old chiller that would annually reduce West Park’s environmental footprint by 127 tonnes of CO2 and air-conditioning use by an estimated 37 per cent.

Desired Outcomes

Over the years, West Park has incrementally reduced its electrical demand and carbon footprint to be a leader in energy conservation. Both staff and patients share in the hospital’s advocacy for environmental stewardship and West Park has received several awards to recognize their long-term commitment to conserving energy.
 
As a respected healthcare facility within the community, West Park must continue to manage its resources carefully to ensure that the hospital maximizes its efficiency.

Solution And Results

For its most recent retrofit project, West Park teamed up with the City of Toronto’s Better Buildings Partnership (BBP) to upgrade the cooling system. The BBP facilitated the replacement of West Park’s outdated, 30-year-old chiller with two smaller, energy-efficient units that better matched the building’s needs and allowed the hospital to cut their air conditioning energy use by 37 per cent. With the overall project costing more than $1 million, the BBP helped to offset the expense by providing an incentive of $47,480.00 based on demand savings of 118.7 kW.
 
West Park has been serving the communities of Toronto and Ontario for over 100 years. During that time, the hospital has greatly reduced its impact on the environment by consistently implementing solutions to improve its energy management. In continuing their commitment to energy conservation, Michael Bonnah was appointed as the Chief Energy Conservation Officer in May 2009 to oversee West Park’s ongoing journey to improve energy efficiency.

Project Snapshot

Project cost: $1,419,342.00
Annual electricity savings: 118.7 kW
Annual cost savings: 37% of electrical energy use related to cooling
Annual CO2 savings: 127 tonnes of CO2
BBP Incentives received:$47,480.00
Payback period: Over ten years