Community Involvement

Toronto Sport Hall of Honour

image of able bodied and para athletes racing across the Humber river pedestrian bridge with the city of Toronto skyline in background

The Toronto Sport Hall of Honour celebrates the exceptional contributions and accomplishments of those who have inspired and/or brought recognition to the City of Toronto through sport. Nominations from all levels of performance and ability are welcome.

This initiative is made possible by Toronto’s Host City Showcase Program, which builds upon the success of the TORONTO 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games, ensuring a legacy of long-term community benefits for Toronto.

NEW Nominations for 2016 are now open

 

The 2015 Inductees:

Vaune Davis, Female Athlete of the Year

Vaune Davis, Female Athlete of the year, Road CyclingVaune Davis
Female Athlete of the Year

Road Cycling

In early adulthood, Vaune Davis was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, a condition that slowly attacks and, in her case, destroys joints.

In 2010, her husband encouraged her to try a spin class. Unable to complete the full class, Vaune returned until she could. The following year, she attempted Paris-Brest-Paris, a 90 hour, 1200 km, cycling event; Vaune fell short of the finish line by a mere 140 km.

In 2014, she set her sights on her greatest challenge yet—the Race Across the West, a 90 hour, 1400 km race across four US states. Succeeding in just over 86 hours, Vaune slept twice for six hours, between traversing deserts with temperatures exceeding 45ºC and up almost 40,000 feet of mountains. She was the only solo-female athlete to compete that year and the oldest female athlete to ever succeed at this feat of endurance and determination.

By the end of 2014, Vaune had achieved two more podium finishes, one 24-hour and one 500-mile race; she also won the Ultra Marathon Cycling Association’s overall women’s World Cup title.

Shelley Gautier, Female Athlete of the Year with a Disability

Shelley Gautier, Female Athlete of the Year with a Disability, Para-CyclingShelley Gautier
Female Athlete of the Year with a Disability

Para-Cycling

In 2001, Shelley Gautier was a practicing physiotherapist holding a degree in physical education, when a mountain-bike accident left her with severe head injuries. Shelley spent eight months in rehabilitation and, within a year of the accident, she was back on a bike. By 2007, Shelley was competing in 50 km races and, in 2009, she was the first female tricycle T1 rider on the international scene.

In 2014, she won both the road race and the individual time trial at the Union Cycliste Internationale World Championships in Greenville, South Carolina. This continued to be a tremendous year for Shelley: she was named Ontario Cycling Association Road Female Athlete of the Year; she launched the Shelley Gautier ParaSport Foundation, to provide encouragement and opportunities for people with disabilities to be participate in sport; and she was the second Canadian to ever be nominated for the prestigious Laureus World Sportperson of the Year with a Disability Award.

Shelley is currently on an impressive winning streak of eight consecutive World Championships titles and is in training to qualify for the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Milos Raonic, Male Athlete of the Year

Milos Raonic, Male athlete of the year, TennisMilos Raonic
Male Athlete of the Year

Tennis

Born in Montenegro, professional tennis player Milos Raonic moved to Canada at age three and was an avid tennis player by age six. He achieved the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) top-10 rankings in 2013 and has remained a top-10 contender ever since.

In 2014, Milos reached the quarter-finals or better at seven of nine Masters 1000 events, including two semifinals and a final. He became the first Canadian in the Open Era to reach the semifinals of a Grand Slam by finishing in the final four at Wimbledon. This win earned Milos a career-high ranking as world No. 6. Milos advanced to his second career Masters 1000 final at Paris, defeating Roger Federer. He qualified for the ATP World Tour Finals, becoming the first Canadian men’s singles player and first player born in the 1990s to do so.

He was named Canadian Press Male Athlete of the Year for the second straight time in 2014. Milos is currently preparing for the new challenges ahead, including readying to bring home a medal for Canada at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Anthony Gale, Male Athlete of the Year with a Disability

Anthony Gale, Male athlete of the year with a disability, Sledge HockeyAnthony Gale
Male Athlete of the Year with a Disability

Sledge Hockey

Anthony Gale was born with spina bifida, a birth defect that affects the formation of the spinal cord and can affect leg function and even cause paralysis.

Anthony first participated in sledge hockey with Cruisers Sports for the Physically Disabled at age 7 and was an immediate convert. Although he went on to try other sports, sledge hockey remained his passion At 13, Anthony was named to Ontario’s Provincial Sledge Hockey Team and again at 16. One year later, Anthony was the youngest player named to the Canadian National Sledge Hockey Team. He was selected to represent Canada at the 2014 Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia and brought home a bronze medal. Anthony tied for second in points on the team with 6 points, 2 goals and 4 assists. He went on to be named to the National team for the 2014/15 season, contributing to Canada’s silver-medal win at the International Paralympic Committee Sledge Hockey World Championships in Buffalo.

Currently, Anthony is focusing on his education and is enrolled at Sheridan College in Brampton, Ontario.

Jennifer Yiu Yiu Lee, Coach of the Year

Jennifer Yiu Yiu Lee, Coach of the Year, BadmintonJennifer Yiu Yiu Lee
Coach of the Year

Badminton

Jennifer Yiu Yiu Lee began playing badminton at the age of 11. She held a position on the Hong Kong Badminton Team until immigrating to Vancouver in 1985. She moved to Toronto two years later, where she continued her badminton career.

After a major injury in 1993, Jennifer became a coach, dedicating herself to developing great badminton players. In 1995, she established Lee’s Badminton Training Centre. Jennifer believes in not only developing athletes’ badminton skills and techniques, but also in developing their character, by achieving a balance between the mind and body.

She holds a Level 3 National Coach Certification and is working towards an Advanced Coaching Diploma at the Canadian Sport Institute Ontario. Jennifer has developed many Provincial, National and International champions, including Michelle Li and Rachel Honderich, who won medals at the 2014 Pan Am Championship and at the Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games in 2015. Jennifer volunteers in many schools to promote the sport to a wider audience. Her vision is to establish badminton as a world-class sport in North America.

York Lions Men's Soccer Team, Team of the Year

York Lions men's soccer, Team of the YearYork Lions Men's Soccer Team
Team of the Year

In 2014, the York University Lions men’s soccer team played one of the best seasons in Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) history. In the regular season, the Lions dominated their opponents to finish atop the Ontario University Athletics (OUA) West Division for the eighth straight year. They continued their winning streak in the conference playoffs capturing their fourth conference title in the program history.

At the CIS Championships, the Lions won six straight playoff games without allowing a single goal. They finished the season undefeated with an overall goal differential of +61 and an overall record of 20-0-2; they won their second straight OUA Championship and their third national title in the last seven seasons.

At the end of the year, the Lions had three players named CIS all-Canadians (Jarek Whiteman, Jonathan Lao and Casey D’Mello), as well as six who earned OUA all-star honours (Whiteman, Lao and D’Mello, Daniel Fabrizi, Joey Cicchillo and Matt Stinson). Whiteman was also named OUA West most valuable player and head coach Carmine Isacco received both the OUA and CIS Coach of the Year awards.

Archie Allison, Builder

Archie Allison, Builder, Inclusive RecreationArchie Allison,
Builder

Inclusive Recreation

Archie Allison’s experience at Variety Village has encompassed every level of program delivery and development—from his beginning as a program instructor in 1984 to his current role as Director of Access and Awareness. He is a dedicated practitioner and advocate of inclusive recreation, especially the ‘reverse integration’ approach, in which programs are designed to meet the interests of the child with a disability first with community needs addressed secondarily.

Archie is a sought-after educator in the area of inclusive recreation and teaches at the University of Toronto, Humber College and Centennial College. He is also an active volunteer on several committees dedicated to inclusion and advocacy for those with disabilities. He has worked on many special sporting events, including organizing the Variety Village Lieutenant Governor’s Games for over thirty years.

In his current role at Variety Village, Archie leads a team who deliver inclusive outreach and adapted physical education programs to over 10,000 students in Ontario annually. Archie’s achievements and dedication have been recognized through numerous honours, including the Canadian Disability Hall of Fame.

Alan Brookes, Builder

Alan Brookes, Builder, Running Alan Brookes
Builder

Running

Alan Brookes first organized a race in 1983 while he was a history professor at the University of Guelph. In 1987, he began to pursue a full-time career as a race director. Alan was also a competitive club runner in his own right, with a best time of 2:34 for a full marathon.

In 1990, he founded the Coors Light Running Series, a six-pack of races in Downtown Toronto combining international-class athletics with community fundraising. In 1999, events in Vancouver and Montreal were added to form the Canada Running Series/Circuit du Canada. The series finale, the Coors Light Toronto Half-Marathon, eventually evolved into the prestigious International Association of Athletics Federations Gold Label Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon and Half-Marathon, attracting 26,000 runners annually. In 2015, he and his team, were commissioned to organize the Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games marathons and race walks.

Alan’s driving mission is “building community through running,” a principle he implements through the twin pillars of organization and innovation. Alan is a tireless champion of distance running and a committed community worker.

Marilyn Bell DiLascio, Sport Legend

Marilyn Bell DiLascio, Sport Legend, Marathon Swimming

Marilyn Bell Dilascio
Sport Legend

Marathon Swimming

In September of 1954, Marilyn Bell completed first successful swim across Lake Ontario, setting a world record for the longest marathon swim to date—51.5 km.

Marilyn went on to swim the English Channel in 1955 and Juan de Fuca Strait in 1956, before retiring from professional marathon swimming at the age of 19. Her accomplishments not only encouraged the development of marathon swimming in Canada, it inspired Canadians, especially Canadian women to athletic endeavours.

Marilyn has received many awards recognizing her sport contributions, including The Lou Marsh Trophy, and has been inducted into the Ontario Aquatic Hall of Fame, Ontario Sports Hall of Fame, International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame and Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame. She has also been honoured with the naming of a provincial park and a National Historical Site of Significance federal plaque along Lake Ontario, both marking the site she made landfall after her historic feat.

Marilyn remains active within the community, providing mentoring to many of the Lake Ontario Swimmers and sits on the Advisory Board of Solo Swims of Ontario. She continues to swim every day.

Angela James, Sport Legend

Angela James, Sport Legend, HockeyAngela James
Sport Legend

Hockey

Angela James grew up in Toronto, beginning her hockey career playing for the Flemingdon Boys House League and select teams. She played for the Women’s National Team for 10 years, winning a remarkable four World Gold Championships and four International Pacific Rim Championships. Angela is the Ontario College Athletic Association (OCAA) all-time scoring champion. She was also a member of the 1992 and 1994 Canadian Women’s Roller Hockey Team, winning gold at the World Championships.

Angela is a member of the Seneca College Hall of Fame, the Ball Hockey Hall of Fame, the OCAA Hall of Fame, the International Ice Hockey Hall of Fame (one of the first female members to be inducted), the Canada Sports Hall of Fame, and she is the first female to ever be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

She continues to be active in hockey through officiating and coaching. Angela runs numerous hockey schools for coaches and athletes, focusing on program development to grow players from the beginner to national level. Angela is considered a pioneer and the first superstar of women’s hockey.

Marina van der Merwe, Sport Legend

Marina van der Merwe, Sport Legend Field HockeyMarina van der Merwe
Sport Legend

Field Hockey

Dr. Marina van de Merwe’s early coaching successes include leading the University of Toronto women’s field hockey team to nine championships. She built on this impressive record at York University where she coached the women’s field and indoor hockey teams from 1971 to 1999. Highlights of her tenure include six Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union (CIAU) silver medals, two CIAU bronze medals, and seven OUA titles. She has received numerous CIAU and OUA Coach of the Year awards, and CIS named their coach of the year award the Marina van der Merwe Award.

Marina coached the Ontario Junior and Senior Provincial Squads, the latter of which medalled at the Canada Summer Games. She was the coach of the Canadian National Women’s Field Hockey Team for an incredible 19 years (1976 to1995). Marina developed the team into an international powerhouse; they become second ranked in the world, a feat that has not been accomplished since. Marina coached at three Olympic Games, six World Cups and three Pan Am Games.

Marina is a member of the Field Hockey Hall of Fame and Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame.

Johnny Bower, Sport Legend

Johnny Bower, Sport Legend, HockeyJohnny Bower
Sport Legend

Hockey

While Johnny Bower’s hockey career began in Saskatchewan with goalie pads made from an old mattress and pucks from “cow pies,” he became one of the sport’s greatest goalies.

After eight seasons in the American Hockey League (AHL), Johnny moved to the National Hockey League (NHL). In 1958, he joined the Toronto Maple Leafs, leading the team to the playoffs in his first season. Johnny played 11 seasons, four of which culminated in Stanley Cup Championships (1962 – 1964, 1967). Johnny was the oldest player on the Leafs; by his final game on December 10, 1969 he was also the oldest, full-time player ever to participate in an NHL game and still holds the record for the oldest NHL goaltender.

Following retirement in 1970, Johnny remained with the Leafs as a scout and goalie coach. His accomplishments have been recognized by the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame, the AHL Hall of Fame, the Hockey Hall of Fame, a star on Canada’s Walk of Fame and a statue in Legends Row at the Air Canada Centre. Johnny is a two-time winner of the Vezina Trophy.

George Seymour Lyon, Sport Legend

George Seymour Lyon, Sport Legend, GolfGeorge Seymour Lyon
Sport Legend

Golf

George Seymour Lyon was born in 1858. An all-round athlete, George pursued golf from the age of 37 and three years later he won the Canadian Amateur. He won Olympic gold in 1904, playing the final match in a virtual monsoon to beat an opponent who was 26 years younger. Afterwards, George celebrated by walking across the room on his hands.

George was a runner-up in the Canadian Open in 1910. He won the Canadian Amateur Championship a record eight times between 1889 and 1914, with his final win at age 56. He continued his successes by winning the Canadian Seniors’ Golf Association Championship 10 times between 1918 and 1930, acquiring his last title at the age of 72.

George was one of the original eight founding committee members to build the Lambton Golf & Country Club and was appointed captain for 23 successive years. He has been inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Golf Hall of Fame.

Herb Carnegie, Spirit of Sport

Herb Carnegie, Spirit of Sport HockeyHerb Carnegie
Spirit of Sport

Hockey

Herbert H. Carnegie was a talented hockey player, who courageously confronted racial discrimination, inspiring countless people of all ages and backgrounds. Throughout his career, Herbert played with the Ontario Hockey Association and the Quebec Senior Hockey League, but never reached the NHL.

In 1954, Herbert established the Future Aces Hockey School for children 12-14 years, the first registered hockey school in Canada. This lead to the development of the Herbert H. Carnegie Future Aces Foundation which promotes good citizenship and character building in schools, as well as awarding post-secondary scholarships to high-school students who demonstrate exemplary citizenship qualities and community service.

Herbert was also a successful businessman and an exceptional golfer, winning two Canadian Senior Golf Championships in 1977 and 1978.

His tireless community-building efforts and his commitment to the betterment of society have been recognized through numerous honours, such as the Order of Ontario in 1996 and the Order of Canada in 2004. Herbert was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame.

Glenn Tarver, Lifetime Achievement

Glenn Tarver, Lifetime Achievement, RugbyGlenn Tarver
Lifetime Achievement

Rugby

Glenn Tarver played for Toronto’s Balmy Beach Rugby Club from 1961 to 1978, who claimed the Carling Cup as Provincial Champions in 1975.

Following his career as a high-performance athlete, Glenn continued his involvement in rugby as a coach and administrator. Through these roles, Glenn has contributed to the development of rugby as a sport at both the Provincial and National level. The provincial junior program, of which he was the director, produced many national team players.

Since 1998, Glenn has served on the Rugby Ontario Board, including a term as President. He has been a director of multiple committees. He served on the Rugby Canada High Performance Committee from 2004 to 2007 and as the National Championships Commissioner since 2014. Glenn’s contributions to amateur sport have been recognized through the Province of Ontario Award for Excellence/Contributions to Amateur Sports, High School Sports, and his induction into the Rugby Ontario Hall of Fame in 2008.

The Toronto Sport Hall of Honour awards feature ten distinct categories of recognition:

Athlete of the Year (6 categories)

Categories: Female Athlete, Male Athlete, Female Para-Athlete, Male Para-Athlete, Female Special Olympics Athlete, Male Special Olympics Athlete 

Athlete of the Year is awarded to any individual amateur athlete who has achieved outstanding and extraordinary success, demonstrates exemplary values and/or personal characteristics, and makes a defining contribution to his/her sport and/or community. Selections are based on the nominee's achievements for the year 2015.

The nominee must:

  • have been born in Toronto OR lived in Toronto two (2) years OR represented and brought honour to Toronto
  • demonstrated an outstanding level of achievement or a single remarkable achievement of note in 2015
  • has been outstanding in his/her field even if not reaching the top level in any one sport
  • exemplary display of sportsmanship will be considered with athletic endeavours
  • demonstrated significant competitive accomplishments for 2015
  • recognized for Local, Provincial, National or International achievement(s)
  • demonstrated off the field of play contributions to community

Nomination form

Nomination submissions accepted from April 15 until August 12, 2016

Team of the Year

Team of the Year is awarded to any two or more individuals competing as a single entry in amateur sport who have achieved outstanding and extraordinary success, demonstrated exemplary values and/or admirable characteristics, and make a defining contribution to their sport and/or community. Selections are based on the team's achievements for the year 2015.

The nominee must:

  • 50% of the team's members must have been born in Toronto OR lived in Toronto for two (2) consecutive years OR brought honour to Toronto
  • demonstrated an outstanding level of achievement or a single remarkable achievement of note in 2015
  • have been outstanding in their field even if not reaching the top level in any one sport
  • exemplary display of sportsmanship will be considered with athletic endeavours
  • demonstrated significant competitive accomplishments in 2015
  • recognized for Local, Provincial, National or International achievement(s)
  • demonstrated off the field of play contributions to community

Nomination form

Nomination submissions accepted from April 15 until August 12, 2016

Coach of the Year

Coach of the Year is awarded to any coach in amateur sport who has achieved outstanding and extraordinary success, demonstrates exemplary values and/or personal characteristics, and has made a defining contribution to his/her sport and/or community. This person possesses the qualities associated with performance excellence and sport achievement. Selections are based on the nominee's achievements for the past calendar year.

The nominee must:

  • have been born in Toronto OR lived in Toronto for two (2) years OR represented and brought honour to Toronto
  • demonstrated an outstanding level of achievement or a single remarkable achievement of note in 2015
  • has been outstanding in his/her field even if not reaching the top level in any one sport
  • exemplary display of sportsmanship will be considered with coaching endeavours
  • demonstrated significant coaching accomplishments in 2015
  • recognized for Local, Provincial, National or International achievement(s)
  • demonstrated off the field of play contributions to community

Nomination form

Nomination submissions accepted from April 15 until August 12, 2016

Builder - Individual

Builder is awarded to any individual who has made a meaningful contribution to amateur sport as a leader, advocate, change agent or builder. A Builder may be an administrator, executive, sport volunteer or a grassroots supporter. This award may be presented to an individual only once in a lifetime.

The nominee must:

  • have been born in Toronto OR lived in Toronto for two (2) years OR represented and brought honour to Toronto
  • shows commitment of leadership to sport development
  • demonstrated contributions to the establishment of sport from its infancy to mature state with community
  • kept sport alive within the community
  • enhanced or improved sport development
  • contributed to the development of infrastructure within sport
  • demonstrated commitment to sport over a period of time
  • recognized for Local, Provincial, National or International achievement(s)

Nomination form

Nomination submissions accepted from April 15 until August 12, 2016

Corporate Builder

The Corporate Builder is awarded to any organization/corporation that has made a meaningful contribution to amateur sport as a leader, advocate, change agent or builder. A Corporate Builder may be an organization/corporation, executive board, media or member thereof. This award may be presented to an organization/corporation only once in a lifetime.

The nominee must:

  • have a minimum of five (5) years of significant contribution to sport in the City of Toronto
  • has developed sport in or represented and brought honour to Toronto
  • shows commitment of leadership to sport development
  • demonstrated contributions to the establishment of sport from its infancy to mature state with community
  • kept sport alive within the community
  • enhanced or improved sport development
  • contributed to the development of infrastructure within sport
  • demonstrated commitment to sport over a period of time
  • recognized for Local, Provincial, National or International achievement(s)

Nomination form

Nomination submissions accepted from April 15 until August 12, 2016

"City of Sport" - Lifetime Achievement

"City of Sport" - Lifetime Achievement recognizes the outstanding contribution of a sport leader or organization who exemplifies sport values as demonstrated by ground breaking organizational leadership, innovative practices, influential communications, cutting edge sport marketing or positioning of the sport sector. This award is granted for a performance that is very special and destined to be of extraordinary significance for Toronto, Ontario or Canada and may be presented only once in a lifetime.

The nominee must:

  • have been born in Toronto OR lived in Toronto for two (2) years OR represented and brought honour to Toronto
  • recognizes a person who made significant contributions to sport beyond athletic endeavours over a minimum of ten (10) years
  • recognized for Local, Provincial, National or International achievement(s)
  • served on Boards of sport organizations
  • had a role as a coach, administrator, volunteer, official that has made an impact in sport
  • a game changer
  • has made a non-playing impact on sport ie. rule or policy change; playing surface change; way sport is viewed

Nomination form

Nomination submissions accepted from April 15 until August 12, 2016

Sport Legend (2 categories)

Categories: Female Athlete, Male Athlete

Sport Legend recognizes an individual who, by their achievement and example are considered to have had the capacity to inspire Torontonians. An individual, who through extraordinary sporting accomplishments, has left an indelible mark on the fabric of sport in Toronto. This award is granted for a performance that is very special and destined to be of extraordinary significance for Toronto, Ontario or Canada and may be presented only once in a lifetime. 

The nominee must:

  • have been born in Toronto or lived in Toronto for two (2) years OR represented and brought honour to Toronto
  • must have been retired from competition a minimum of three (3) years
  • recognizes a person who achieved extraordinary accomplishments in sport over a number of years
  • is noted for significant career highlights
  • demonstrated commitment to sport for a minimum of five (5) years
  • recognized for Local, Provincial, National or International achievement(s)

Nomination form

Nomination submissions accepted from April 15 until August 12, 2016

Spirit of Sport

Spirit of Sport commends the commitment and humanitarian spirit of a Toronto hero(s) who or project(s) that exhibit(s) the values of true sport while making a meaningful and/or significant contribution to using sport as a tool for positive social change. This award is granted for a performance that is very special and destined to be of extraordinary significance for Toronto, Ontario or Canada.

The nominee must:

  • have been born in Toronto OR lived in Toronto for two (2) years OR represented and brought honour to Toronto
  • demonstrated exemplary sportsmanship, ethical play in competition, dedication and respect for others
  • individual(s) or project(s) that impact a person , organization, or community
  • used sport to promote humanitarian values
  • overcome adversity or challenging circumstances
  • example: Canadian Ski Coach's act of kindness in cross country ski event at Sochi Olympics

Nomination form

Nomination submissions accepted from April 15 until August 12, 2016

Each year, the Selection Committee will review all nominations received, assess them and provide guidance to the City of Toronto in naming the annual award recipients. Members of the Selection Committee represent leaders of the Toronto sports community.

The 2015 Selection Committee is:

Scott Russell

Scott RussellA Gemini Award-winning broadcaster and acclaimed author, Scott Russell brings vast experience, passion and knowledge to his role as host of CBC’s primetime and late night coverage of the Toronto 2015 Pan Am and Parapan Am Games. The CBC veteran’s unparalleled enthusiasm for amateur sport shines through in every aspect of his work for the network.

A CBC Sports veteran of more than 25 years, Russell has covered 12 Olympic Games including the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games.  In 2014, Russell was also the network’s on-site host for coverage of the XX Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, Scotland – his sixth Commonwealth Games with CBC as well as hosting CBC's prime time coverage of 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™. He has also hosted the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa and the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Germany. In addition, Russell was a host and rinkside reporter for CBC's Hockey Night in Canada for 14 years. Outside of his hosting duties, Russell authors the insightful Field of Play blog at cbcsports.ca where he discusses the world of sport from all angles.

After joining CBC Charlottetown in 1985 as a reporter, Russell turned to sports in 1986 and quickly established himself as a talent. From 1988 to 1992, he was a sports reporter and anchor for CBMT in Montreal until he moved to Toronto as a network sports commentator.

Russell has penned two books on hockey, Ice Time: A Canadian Hockey Journey and The Rink - Stories from Hockey's Home Towns, which he co-wrote with Chris Cuthbert. Russell's third book, Open House: Canada and the Magic of Curling, a grassroots look at one of this country's favourite sports.

In addition to his roles at CBC, Russell teaches a course in Canadian Sports History at Toronto's Centennial College. He is also a member of the Canadian Olympic Committee's Education Committee as well as a member of the Ambassador's Council for the Amici camping charity. Russell is a graduate of the University of Western Ontario and holds an M.A. in Journalism. In 2014, he was honoured by Sports Media Canada with the George Gross Award for Outstanding Broadcasting. In 2013, he was presented with a CBC President's Award in the Brand Champion category for his dedication and enthusiasm for his work covering amateur athletics for the network.

An active runner, Russell completed the Boston Marathon in 2005 and in 2012, was awarded a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for his contributions to sports in Canada. He currently lives in Toronto with his wife, Catherine, and their two children.

Follow Scott Russell on Twitter: @SportsWkndScott

Debbie Low

Debbie LowDebbie is currently the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Sport Institute Ontario (CSIO), and has served in this position since November 2005.  As CEO, she is responsible for the daily operation of the Sport Institute and was responsible for leading the transition to Ontario’s first facility-based sport institute as a legacy from the TO 2015 Pan/Para Pan American Games.  

Debbie leads the development and delivery of provincial and national high performance sport programs for the Province of Ontario.  She has spent the majority of her time and efforts over the past number of years re-establishing Ontario as leader in high performance sport.

Before joining the Canadian Sport Institute Ontario, Debbie was the Executive Director of ParaSport Ontario; Director of Sport for Toronto’s 2008 Olympic Bid; and spent ten years with the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport’s Multi-Sport Games Program.

As a volunteer, Debbie has served on a number of Boards and Committees in leadership positions including the Toronto 2015 Pan/Para Pan Am Games Bid Committee; Canadian Paralympic Committee Board of Directors; Association of Sport Performance Centres Board;

Sport Alliance of Ontario Board; the International Paralympic Committee’s Paralympic Games Committee; and member Canadian Disability Hall of Fame Selection Committee,

Debbie was Canada’s Chef de Mission for the 2008 Beijing Paralympic Games: Assistant Chef de Mission for the 2004 Athens Paralympic Games, and involved in 9 sets of Canada Games as part of Team Ontario in various roles including Team Ontario’s Chef de Mission.

Debbie holds a Bachelor of Physical and Health Education from the University of Toronto and a Diploma in Sport Management from Durham College.  And she is currently enrolled in Queen’s University’s Executive Leadership Program.  In 2014, Debbie was acknowledged by Durham College with an Alumnus of Distinction Award, and recognized with a Premier’s Award for Community Service in 2015.   

Debbie was selected to take part in Rick Hansen’s 25th Anniversary of Difference Makers; was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal by the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario in June 2012, and the King Clancy Award in February 2010, in recognition of her contribution to advance the cause of Canadians who live with a disability.  In 2014, she was recognized by CAAWS as one of the Most Influential Women of the Year in Canadian Sport.

Blair McIntosh

Blair McIntoshBlair's career has included more than 33 years in amateur Sport in various leadership roles including Manager of Sport Programs at the Province of Ontario, Director of Games at Sport Alliance Ontario (SAO), CEO of SAO, Director of Sport Tourism at City of London and Director of Sport at the 2015 Pan and Para Pan Am Games in Toronto.  He is currently the VP of Sport at Special Olympics Canada.  He was the Chef de Mission for Team Canada at the 2010 Paralympic Games and has been a lead Games Consultant or Mission Staff to more than 175 Major Multi-sport Games including 15 sets of Canada Games where he was Chef de Mission for Team Ontario 8 times.  He played leadership roles in numberous major national and international events including the 1997 World Special Olympics, the 2000 World Women’s Hockey Championships and Project Manager for World Youth Day 2002 in Toronto.

He has been responsible for Chairing and evaluating more than 150 bids for major sporting events at the Provincial, National and International level.  While he was in his role as the Director of Sport Tourism for the City of London for 2 years he was successful in securing more than 15 major sporting events for the City of London including the 2005 Memorial Cup, 2005 BMO Canadian Figure Skating Championships, 2006 Scott Tournament of Hearts and the 2007 World Synchronized Skating Championships and the 2010 National Special Olympic Games to name a few.  These events generated approximately $90M in economic impact to the City of London.

He also served as a member of Canada Games Council Sport Committee for 10 years and currently serves as the High Performance Director on the Board for the Canadian Paralympic Committee as well as being a Board member for the Canadian Sport Tourism Alliance. 

As a private consultant, Blair has also developed Sport Tourism Strategies for many comminities/provinces/territories across the country.  As well, Blair speaks annually at major conferences on the business of sport tourism, bidding and hosting and developing sport tourism strategies.

Paul Rosen

In 1975, while playing hockey in an AAA midget game, Paul caught his skate in a rut breaking his leg in 14 places. In the following years he faced many physical challenges, surgeries, and chronic pain until his leg was amputated above the right knee in 1999. Paul will tell you that this is the year his life began. Shortly afterwards, he began to play sledge hockey with the Markham Islanders. Two years later, Paul made the Canada Sledge Hockey Team. He was the oldest rookie in the history of the Paralympic Winter Games when he played in Salt Lake City (2002). The quintessential team player, Paul led Team Canada to a gold medal at the 2006 Paralympic Games in Torino.

While teaching sledge hockey during the Canadian Paralympic Committee's "Soldier On Paralympic Sport Summit" Paul unexpectedly joined in a sitting volleyball session. This lead to Paul becoming a member of Canada's sitting-volleyball team and representing Canada at the 2007 Parapan American Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Paul retired from his athletic career following the 2010 Paralympic Games in Vancouver. However, he remains active in the sport community as a motivational speaker and volunteer. Paul has received two Paul Harris Fellow Recognition Awards from the Rotary Club, was featured in "Sled Head", a documentary about Sledge Hockey, serves as an ambassador for numerous causes, and was awarded the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal.

Sheilagh Croxon

Sheilagh CroxonFor over twenty five years Sheilagh has been one of this country’s top synchronized swimming coaches. A visionary leader, Sheilagh coached the 1996 Canadian Olympic synchro team to a silver medal finish in Atlanta. Four years later, as the team’s Head Coach, she led Canada to a memorable Olympic bronze medal performance. In 2008 at the Beijing Games, she coached New Zealand’s pair to qualify for their first Games since 1984. A chartered professional coach, Sheilagh’s coaching resume includes dozens of international podium successes at major competitions. Sheilagh’s coaching expertise is sought out by synchro federations and clubs around the world, and she regularly mentors other coaches and shares her knowledge through workshops and clinics.

Shawn Sheridan

Shawn SheridanShawn Sheridan is the Chair of OUTSPORT TORONTO, a not-for-profit umbrella organisation with over 20 member groups that deliver programming in amateur sport and recreation to the LGBT community.  With its member organisations, allies, and partners, OUTSPORT TORONTO works to create safe, welcoming spaces where everyone can get out and play!  

Shawn has been involved in amateur sport in various capacities for more than 25 years. He spent over 15 years actively involved in aquatics as an instructor, lifeguard, swimmer, and examiner for the National Lifeguard Service, over 14 years as an avid rock climber, ten years as a horseman, picked up cross-country skiing a few years ago, is a sailor, and has dabbled in running, squash, and other sports activities.  He was involved in the formation of OUTSPORT TORONTO as a member of the governance committee, and was appointed its Chair in June of 2010.

Outside of sport, Shawn has held a number of executive-level information technology positions with national and international financial services firms, and has worked as well in consumer packaged goods, retail, insurance, and consulting industries, and runs his own information technology consultancy.  He is a graduate of the University of Waterloo with a Bachelor of Mathematic in Computer Science.

Mary Cicinelli

Mary CicinelliMary was has been a sport volunteer for over 30 years.   She served as the President of Field Hockey Canada (FHC).  Currently, Mary sits on the Board of Directors for the Pan American Hockey Federation (PAHF) and a member of the Executive Board of Federation International Hockey (FIH).  Mary sits on many international committees and was the Chair of the Sport Organizing Committee for Field Hockey at the 2015 Pan American Games in Toronto.   Mary has also been a Canadian level umpire and a National Team Manager.

Molly Killingbeck

Molly KillingbeckMolly Killingbeck is a two-time Olympian (1984, 1988), winning a silver medal in  the 4 x 400m relay in Los Angeles in 1984.  Her extensive sport background includes, Sport Manager – TO2015 PanAm/Parapan Am Games Organizing Committee, National Team Coach/High Performance Centre Lead Coach – Athletics Canada; Event Manager – Post Olympic Excellence Series (Canadian Olympic Committee); Athlete Services Manager – Canadian Sport Centre Ontario; Varsity Coach, Track and Field – York University and University of Windsor.

Killingbeck is an active public speaker, devotes much of her free time to community outreach programs, and is a member of the Board of Directors for Pencils for Kids and the Toronto Sports Council. 

Photo and Video Credits

George Lyon, Marilyn Bell, Marina van der Merwe
Canada's Sports Hall of Fame | Pantheon des sports canadiens
sportshall.ca | pantheonsports.ca

Anthony Gale, Angela James
Hockey Canada
hockeycanada.ca
Hockey Hall of Fame

Shelley Gauthier
Canadian Paralympic Committee | Comité Paralympique Canadien
paralympic.ca | paralympique.ca

Canadian Olympic Committee

City of Toronto Archives

Field Hockey Canada

Hockey Hall of Fame

Lambton County Golf & Country Club

Race Across America / Race Across the West

Sue Holland

Variety Village

York University Sport & Recreation