"In Toronto, Bombardier manufactures business and commercial jets and relies on the diversified, local regional supply chain. We work with more than 70 suppliers located in the Greater Toronto Area on almost all our business and commercial aircraft and we benefit from a variety of expertise going from complex machining to systems integration."

Graham Kelly, Vice-President, Global Operations & Toronto Site, Bombardier Aerospace


Toronto is the destination of choice for a wide range of traditional and advanced manufacturing operations. Approximately 4,300 of these firms employ almost 120,000 people, representing nine per cent of Toronto’s total employment. Their activities are integrated across industrial sectors: food and beveragelife sciencesfashion/apparel, information and communications technologies, machinery and equipment, automotive and aerospace. Digital manufacturing, nanomanufacturing, flexible electronics manufacturing and additive manufacturing technologies are all being used or introduced in Toronto. 

The manufacturing landscape has also evolved with the advent of the maker movement - a global movement of computer programmers, crafters, designers, engineers, artists, scientists, and entrepreneurs who are reinventing the way products are made. And the city is seeing an influx in infrastructure to support this movement from organic meet-ups and workshops to more formalized institution-led programs.

Key Industry Sectors

From food services to financial services, ICT to green, fashion, film, tourism and life sciences, Toronto's multi-sector strength drives growth, innovation and synergies.

Find out more about Toronto's key industry sectors.

Facts & Figures

Second largest aerospace cluster in Canada providing a broad range of aerospace/aviation design, manufacturing, and product support for the global industry
–Industry Canada

Second largest and fastest growing food and beverage sector in North America with more than 1,100 food and beverage production establishments
–Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey, 2011