Voters

Who Can Vote

You can vote in Toronto’s municipal election if you are:

  • a Canadian citizen; and
  • at least 18 years old; and
  • a resident in the City of Toronto; or
  • a non-resident of the City of Toronto, but you or your spouse own or rent property in the City; and
  • not prohibited from voting under any law

You may only vote once in the City of Toronto municipal election regardless of how many properties you own or rent within the City. You must vote in the ward where you live. 

An owner or tenant of non-residential property, or their spouse, is not eligible to vote for School Board Trustee. 

 

Terms you may need help understanding

  • As a resident elector
    • Your residence is where you live. If you live in a municipality, then you are eligible to vote in that municipality's election. You are only allowed to have one residence. 
  • As a non-resident elector
    •  If you live in one municipality, and own or rent property in another municipality, you are eligible to vote in each municipality's election. 
  • As the spouse of a non-resident elector
    • If your spouse qualifies as a non-resident elector in a municipality, then you can also vote in that municipality's election. 

 

Students

If you are a student and consider your "home" to be the place where you live when you are not attending school, which means you plan on returning there, then you are eligible to vote in both your "home" municipality and in the municipality where you currently live while attending school. If you are a student attending school in another city, please check with the City Clerk of that municipality to find out what your voting options are.

As a student and a resident of the City of Toronto, if you are unable to vote in the City of Toronto Municipal Election, you may appoint another elector as Proxy to vote on your behalf.  Find out more about appointing a Proxy.

 

Who Can Vote in a School Board Election

In order to vote in a school board election you must be 18 years of age or older, and a Canadian citizen. If you are a resident of municipality, you are eligible to vote for school board trustee. If you are the owner or tenant (or spouse of an owner of tenant) of residential property in a municipality, you are eligible to vote for school trustee. Note: school boards can cover a large area of a municipality. You are only allowed to vote for the same school board once.

If you are eligible to vote in a municipality because you are the owner or tenant (or spouse of an owner or tenant) of a commercial property there, you are not eligible to vote for school trustee.  

There are four different kinds of school boards in Ontario:

English-language public school board

This is the default - unless you are qualified to vote for a separate or French board, you will vote for the English public school board in your area. 

English language separate school board

You must be Roman Catholic, and you must be a separate school board supporter or the spouse of a separate school board supporter. If your spouse is a Roman Catholic and you are not, you are not eligible.

French language public school board

You must be a French language rights holder, and you must be a supporter (or the spouse of a supporter) of the French language public school board.

French language separate school board

You must be a Roman Catholic and a French language rights holder, and you must be a supporter (or the spouse of a supporter) of the French separate school board. If your spouse is a Roman Catholic and you are not, you are not eligible. 

"Supporter" refers to which school board the school portion of your property taxes goes to. The default is the public school system. In order to be a separate school supporter you must direct your taxes to the separate school system. Contact the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation (1-866-296-6722) for more information. 

 

Who Cannot Vote

You are prohibited from voting on voting day if you are:

  • a person serving a sentence of imprisonment in a penal or correctional institution
  • a corporation
  • a person acting as executor or trustee or in another representative capacity, except as a voting proxy
  • a person convicted of a corrupt practice described in section 90(3) of the Municipal Elections Act, 1996

 

Identification is needed when you go to vote. Remember to bring:

  • One piece of identification showing your name and qualifying (Toronto) address

Your voter information card cannot be used as a piece of identification. View the complete list of acceptable identification.

  • If you do not have acceptable ID, but your name is on the voters' list you will be required to sign a Declaration of Identity to receive a ballot.
  • If you do not have acceptable ID, and are not on the voters' list, you will be asked to return with your ID in order to receive a ballot.

 


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