Dufferin Wilson

Purpose of the Study

The Dufferin/Wilson Regeneration Area Study will establish 'tailor-made' strategies and a planning framework for development in the study area, implemented through site and area specific policies.  The Regeneration Areas designation provides for a broad mix of uses, which can include residential, institutional, commercial, light industrial, parks and open spaces. Regeneration Areas are key to the Official Plan's growth strategy to reintegrate areas of the City that are no longer productive due to shifts in the local or global economies.  

The Dufferin/Wilson Regeneration Area Study was initiated because as a result of the City's Five Year Review of the Official Plan and Municipal Comprehensive Review. 

At its meeting held on November 21st, 2013, the Planning and Growth Management Committee adopted a Report from the Chief Planner which outlined proposed City-wide Employment Areas policy directions. Council enacted and passed Official Plan Amendment 231 by By-law No. 1714-2013 on December 18, 2013 with respect to the Economic Health Policies and the Policies, Designations and Mapping for Employment Areas. This Amendment converted the Employment Areas lands in the Dufferin/Wilson area, through re-designation, to Regeneration Areas, and introduced a site and area specific policy to guide future development. 

Study Area

The study area is generally bounded by Wilson Avenue, Dufferin Street and Billy Bishop Way. All lands are located within Ward 9.

Study Background

Toronto's Official Plan

Toronto's Official Plan sets out the vision for where and how the city will grow to the year 2031. The vision of the Plan is about creating an attractive and safe city that evokes pride, passion and a sense of belonging - a city where people of all ages and abilities can enjoy a good quality of life. A city with:

  • vibrant neighbourhoods that are part of complete communities;
  • affordable housing choices that meet the needs of everyone throughout their life;
  • attractive, tree lined streets with shops and housing that are made for walking;
  • a comprehensive and high quality affordable transit system that lets people move around the City quickly and conveniently;
  • a strong and competitive economy with a vital downtown that creates and sustains well-paid, stable, safe and fulfilling employment opportunities for all Torontonians;
  • clean air, land and water;
  • green spaces of all sizes and public squares that bring people together;
  • a wealth of recreational opportunities that promote health and wellness;
  • a spectacular waterfront that is healthy, diverse, public and beautiful;
  • cultural facilities that celebrate the best of city living; and
  • beautiful architecture and excellent urban design that astonish and inspire.

Think of it as a blueprint. It describes the general location for new housing, employment, office and retail areas, community services, parks and other land uses. The Official Plan also establishes policies for the built environment such as criteria for how new buildings relate to the street, for improvements to the City's hard services (such as transit, roads, sewers) and for the protection of the City's natural and built environment.

Why is the City reviewing its Official Plan?

Our Official Plan sets out the vision for where and how Toronto will grow to the year 2031. That's a fairly long time, so it is important to do regular "check-ups" to ensure that the Official Plan is working to implement the vision. The Province's Planning Act also requires a municipality to review its Official Plan at least every 5 years. Toronto's Official Plan came into force in June 2006, requiring that the City commence an Official Plan Review in 2011.

The Official Plan Review looks at what policies are working, what policies need to be updated, revised or deleted, and what new policies are required to be added as a result of more recent provincial legislation.

What is a Municipal Comprehensive Review?

This Review looked specifically at the City's designated areas of employment and how the Official Plan policies and designations are working. The Provincial Growth Plan requires the City to address specific criteria if it wants to consider changing the land use permissions for designated areas of employment. Since the City's 5 Year Review of the Official Plan includes a review of policies and designations for employment lands, it is an appropriate opportunity to undertake the Municipal Comprehensive Review at the same time. Council enacted and passed Official Plan Amendment 231 by By-law No. 1714-2013 on December 18, 2013 with respect to the Economic Health Policies and the Policies, Designations and Mapping for Employment Areas